Last modified on 6 December 2014, at 09:48

hut

See also: Hut and hűt

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

(Can this(+) etymology be sourced?) From Middle English *hutte, hotte, from Old French hutte, hute (cottage), from Old High German hutta (hut, cottage), from Proto-Germanic *hudjōn, *hudjō (hut), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kewt- (to deck; cover; covering; skin). Cognate with German Hütte (hut), Dutch hut (hut), West Frisian hutte (hut), Saterland Frisian Hutte (hut), Danish hytte (hut), Swedish hytta (hut). Related to hide.

A traditional hut in Tamil Nadu

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hut (plural huts)

  1. a small wooden shed
  2. a primitive dwelling

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

hut (third-person singular simple present huts, present participle hutting, simple past and past participle hutted)

  1. (rare, archaic, transitive) to put into a hut
    to hut troops in winter quarters
  2. (rare, archaic, intransitive) to take shelter in a hut
    • Washington Irving
      The troops hutted among the heights of Morristown.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Albanian *hut, from Proto-Indo-European *h2eu-t- 'downward(s)'. Cognate to Ancient Greek αὔτως (aútōs, in vain), Gothic 𐌰𐌿𐌸𐍃 (auþs, desert)[1].

AdverbEdit

hut

  1. in vain, vainly
  2. empty, idle
  3. good, appropriate
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From the adverb or an onomatopoeia (compare English hoot).

NounEdit

hut m (indefinite plural hutë, definite singular huti, definite plural hutët)

  1. owl

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Bardhyl Demiraj, Albanische Etymologien (Amsterdam: Rodopoi, 1997), p.205

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hut f, m (plural hutten, diminutive hutje n)

  1. a small wooden shed, hut.
  2. a primitive dwelling.
  3. a cabin on a boat.

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *hūdiz, whence also Old English hyd, Old Norse húð

NounEdit

hūt f

  1. hide
  2. skin

PolishEdit

NounEdit

hut f

  1. genitive plural of huta

SwedishEdit

InterjectionEdit

hut

  1. behave! (same as: du ska veta hut! = vet hut! = hut!)

NounEdit

hut n

  1. decency, good manners, politeness, reason, common sense; only in a few expressions:
    du ska veta hut
    you should behave
    jag ska lära dig veta hut
    I shall teach you some decency
    jag kräver hut och hyfs av mina barn
    I demand good manners and behaviour of my children

Usage notesEdit

  • Very rarely, one sees a definite form hutet

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit