Last modified on 9 August 2014, at 01:19

kennel

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman, from a Old Northern French variant of Old French chenil (whence modern French chenil), from Vulgar Latin *canile, ultimately from Latin canis

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kennel (plural kennels)

  1. A house or shelter for a dog.
    – We want to look at the dog kennels.
    – That's the pet department, second floor.
  2. A facility at which dogs are reared or boarded.
    The town dog-catcher operates the kennel for strays.
    She raises registered Dalmatians at her kennel.
  3. (UK) The dogs kept at such a facility; a pack of hounds.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 3, ch. IX, Working Aristocracy
      A world of mere Patent-Digesters will soon have nothing to digest: such world ends, and by Law of Nature must end, in ‘over-population;’ in howling universal famine, ‘impossibility,’ and suicidal madness, as of endless dog-kennels run rabid.
  4. The hole of a fox or other animal.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

kennel (third-person singular simple present kennels, present participle kenneling or kennelling, simple past and past participle kenneled or kennelled)

  1. (transitive) To house or board a dog (or less commonly another animal).
    While we're away our friends will kennel our pet poodle.
  2. (intransitive) To lie or lodge; to dwell, as a dog or a fox.
    • L'Estrange
      The dog kennelled in a hollow tree.

Etymology 2Edit

See channel, canal.

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

kennel (plural kennels)

  1. (obsolete) A gutter at the edge of a street.
    • 1899, Guy Boothby, Pharos the Egyptian
      A biting wind whistled through the streets, the pavements were dotted with umbrella-laden figures, the kennels ran like mill-sluices, while the roads were only a succession of lamp-lit puddles through which the wheeled traffic splashed continuously.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hall to this entry?)
  2. (obsolete) A puddle.