Last modified on 19 October 2014, at 09:15

mortal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman mortal, Middle French mortal, and their source Latin mortālis, from mors (death).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mortal (comparative more mortal, superlative most mortal)

  1. Susceptible to death by aging, sickness, injury, or wound; not immortal. [from 14th c.]
  2. Causing death; deadly, fatal, killing, lethal (now only of wounds, injuries etc.). [from 14th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.11:
      Blyndfold he was; and in his cruell fist / A mortall bow and arrowes keene did hold […].
  3. Fatally vulnerable; vital.
    • Milton
      Last of all, against himself he turns his sword, but missing the mortal place, with his poniard finishes the work.
  4. Of or relating to the time of death.
    • Alexander Pope
      Safe in the hand of one disposing Power, / Or in the natal or the mortal hour.
  5. Affecting as if with power to kill; deathly.
    • Dryden
      The nymph grew pale, and in a mortal fright.
    • mortal enemy
  6. Human; belonging to man, who is mortal.
    mortal wit or knowledge; mortal power
    • Milton
      The voice of God / To mortal ear is dreadful.
  7. Very painful or tedious; wearisome.
    a sermon lasting two mortal hours
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)
  8. (UK, slang) Very drunk; wasted; smashed.
    Let's go out and get mortal!

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

mortal (plural mortals)

  1. A human; someone susceptible to death.
    Her wisdom was beyond that of a mere mortal.

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


AsturianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mortal (epicene, plural mortales)

  1. mortal (susceptible to death)
  2. mortal (causing death; deadly; fatal; killing)
  3. deadly (lethal)

SynonymsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mortālis.

AdjectiveEdit

mortal m, f (masculine and feminine plural mortals)

  1. mortal
  2. deadly, lethal

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

mortal m, f (plural mortals)

  1. mortal

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mortal, and their source Latin mortālis, from mors (death).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mortal m, f (plural mortais; comparable and uncomparable)

  1. (not comparable) Susceptible to death; mortal.
  2. (comparable) Prone to cause death; deadly; lethal; fatal.

InflectionEdit

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

mortal m f (plural mortais)

  1. A mortal person.

AntonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mortal m, f (plural mortales)

  1. deadly
  2. mortal

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit