Last modified on 11 August 2014, at 23:49

human

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French humain, from Latin hūmānus (of or belonging to a man, human, humane), from homo (man, human). Spelling human has been predominant since the early 18th century.[1]

Displaced Old English guma (whence Modern English groom).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈçjuː.mən/, /ˈhjuː.mən/
    • (NY, some other US dialects) IPA(key): /ˈjuː.mən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːmən
  • Hyphenation: hu‧man

AdjectiveEdit

human (comparative more human, superlative most human)

  1. (not comparable) Of or belonging to the species Homo sapiens or its closest relatives.
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 36: 
      Like most human activities, ballooning has sponsored heroes and hucksters and a good deal in between. For every dedicated scientist patiently recording atmospheric pressure and wind speed while shivering at high altitudes, there is a carnival barker with a bevy of pretty girls willing to dangle from a basket or parachute down to earth.
  2. (comparable) Having the nature or attributes of a human being.
    To err is human; to forgive is divine.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Look at pages starting with human.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounEdit

Rendition of the humans on the Pioneer 10 plaque

human (plural humans)

  1. A human being, whether man, woman or child.
    • 2013 May-June, Katie L. Burke, “In the News”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 3, page 193: 
      Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola.
    Humans share common ancestors with other apes.

TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Random House Dictionary, 2010

DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

human (neuter humant, definite and plural humane)

  1. human (having the nature or attributes of a human being)
  2. humane (something done from love to humanity)

GermanEdit

German Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia de

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

human (comparative humaner, superlative am humansten)

  1. humane

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hūmānus.

AdjectiveEdit

human m (feminine humana, masculine plural humans, feminine plural humanas)

  1. (Sursilvan) human

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) uman
  • (Puter) umaun

NounEdit

human m (plural humans)

  1. (Sursilvan) (male) human being

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Vallader) uman
  • (Puter) umaun

SynonymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xûmaːn/
  • Hyphenation: hu‧man

AdjectiveEdit

hȕmān (definite hȕmānī, comparative humaniji, Cyrillic spelling ху̏ма̄н)

  1. humane (with regard for the health and well-being of another; compassionate)

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

human

  1. humane, decent, compassionate
    Deras politik har kritiserats för att inte vara human.
    Their politics have been criticised for being less than humane.
  2. (of prices) reasonable
    Det var ett humant pris.
    That was a reasonable price.

DeclensionEdit