Last modified on 23 July 2014, at 01:42

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English odour, from Anglo-Norman odour, from Old French odor, from Latin odor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

odor (countable and uncountable, plural odors)

  1. Any smell, whether fragrant or offensive; scent; perfume.
    • 1895, H. G. Wells, The Time Machine Chapter X
      Now, I still think that for this box of matches to have escaped the wear of time for immemorial years was a strange, and for me, a most fortunate thing. Yet oddly enough I found here a far more unlikely substance, and that was camphor. I found it in a sealed jar, that, by chance, I supposed had been really hermetically sealed. I fancied at first the stuff was paraffin wax, and smashed the jar accordingly. But the odour of camphor was unmistakable.
  2. (figuratively) A strong, pervasive quality.
  3. (figuratively, uncountable) Esteem; repute.

Usage notesEdit

In the United States, the term "odor" often has a negative connotation. Preferred terms for a pleasant odor are "fragrance", "scent", or "aroma".

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

odor m (invariable)

  1. apocopic form of odore

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via rhotacism from Old Latin odōs (plural: odōses), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ed-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

odor m (genitive odōris); third declension

  1. A smell, perfume, stench.
  2. (figuratively) Inkling, suggestion.

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative odor odōrēs
genitive odōris odōrum
dative odōrī odōribus
accusative odōrem odōrēs
ablative odōre odōribus
vocative odor odōrēs

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

odor m (plural odores)

  1. odour; smell

SynonymsEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Italian odore

NounEdit

odor m (plural odori) or odor m (plural oduri)

  1. smell, stink