Last modified on 12 August 2014, at 00:25

slave

See also: slāve, slavē, slāvē, and Slave

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French sclave, from Medieval Latin sclāvus (slave), from Sclāvus (Slav), because Slavs were often forced into slavery in the Middle Ages.[2][3][4][1] Compare Byzantine Greek σκλάβος The word slavery may also be derived from standard Latin servus or servi which was in use before middle ages. [5].

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slave (plural slaves)

  1. A person who is the property of another person and whose labor and also whose life often is subject to the owner's volition.
  2. A person who is legally obliged by prior contract (oral or written) to work for another, with contractually limited rights to bargain; an indentured servant.
  3. One who has lost the power of resistance; one who surrenders to something.
    a slave to passion, to strong drink, or to ambition
  4. A drudge; one who labours like a slave.
  5. An abject person; a wretch.
    Art thou the slave that with thy breath hast kill'd/ Mine innocent child? Shakespeare. Much Ado About Nothing.
  6. A person who is forced against his/her will to perform, for another person or other persons, sexual acts or other personal services on a regular or continuing basis.
  7. (engineering) A device that is controlled by another device.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

slave (third-person singular simple present slaves, present participle slaving, simple past and past participle slaved)

  1. (intransitive) To work hard.
    I was slaving all day over a hot stove.
  2. (transitive) To enslave.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Marston to this entry?)
  3. (transitive) To place a device under the control of another.
    to slave a hard disk
    • 2005, Simon Millward, Fast Guide to Cubase SX (page 403)
      Slaving one digital audio device to another unit using timecode alone results in time-based synchronisation []

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 slave, n.1 (and a.)” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary, second edition, 1989
  2. ^ slave” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  3. ^ slave” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online
  4. ^ slave” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  5. ^ [1]”Economic Structures of Antiquity

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

slave c (singular definite slaven, plural indefinite slaver)

  1. slave

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

slave (imperative slav, infinitive at slave, present tense slaver, past tense slavede, past participle har slavet)

  1. slave

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

In Middle French Sclave ("Slav"), from Medieval Latin sclavus or Sclavus, from Byzantine Greek Σκλάβος (Sklábos)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

slave (masculine and feminine, plural slaves)

  1. Slav, Slavic
    Les langues slaves.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

slave m (uncountable)

  1. Slavic language
    Avant le IXe siècle, on présume que les Slaves partageaient tous une langue à peu près identique appelée le slave commun, mais aucun écrit avant 860 ne peut le prouver.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

slave f

  1. plural form of slavo

NounEdit

slave f

  1. plural form of slavo

AnagramsEdit


LatvianEdit

NounEdit

slave f (5th declension)

  1. (dialectal) fame, glory; alternative form of slava

DeclensionEdit