Last modified on 19 July 2014, at 05:14

phantom

See also: Phantom

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fantom, fantum, from Old French fantosme, from Latin phantasma, from Ancient Greek φάντασμα (phántasma).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

phantom (plural phantoms)

  1. Something apparently seen, heard, or sensed, but having no physical reality; a ghost or apparition; something elusive or delusive.
  2. An image that appears only in the mind; an illusion.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

phantom (not comparable)

  1. Illusive.
    • 1899, Stephen Crane, chapter 1, Twelve O'Clock:
      […] (it was the town's humour to be always gassing of phantom investors who were likely to come any moment and pay a thousand prices for everything) — “[…] Them rich fellers, they don't make no bad breaks with their money. […]”
  2. Fictitious or nonexistent.
    a phantom limb

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

  • phantom” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

AnagramsEdit