Last modified on 25 May 2014, at 16:07

rebuke

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English rebuken, from Anglo-Norman rebuker (to beat back, repel), from re- + Old French *buker, buchier, buschier (to strike, hack down, chop), from busche (wood), from Vulgar Latin buska (wood, grove), from Frankish *busc, *busk (grove), from Proto-Germanic *buskaz (bush). More at re-, bush.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rebuke (plural rebukes)

  1. A harsh criticism.
    • 2012, July 15. Richard Williams in Guardian Unlimited, Tour de France 2012: Carpet tacks cannot force Bradley Wiggins off track
      There was the sternness of an old-fashioned Tour patron in his rebuke to the young Frenchman Pierre Rolland, the only one to ride away from the peloton and seize the opportunity for a lone attack before being absorbed back into the bunch, where he was received with coolness.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rebuke (third-person singular simple present rebukes, present participle rebuking, simple past and past participle rebuked)

  1. To criticise harshly; to reprove.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit