Last modified on 14 September 2014, at 00:46

riddle

See also: Riddle

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English redel, redels, from Old English rǣdels, rǣdelse (counsel", "opinion", "imagination", "riddle), from Proto-Germanic *rēdisliją (counsel, conjecture). Akin to Old Saxon rādisli, rādislo, rēdilsa (Low German Radels, Dutch raadsel), Old High German rātisla (German Rätsel (riddle)), Old English rǣdan (to read, advise, interpret).

NounEdit

riddle (plural riddles)

  1. A verbal puzzle, mystery, or other problem of an intellectual nature.
    "Here's a riddle: It's black, and white, and red all over. What is it?"
    • John Milton (1608-1674)
      To wring from me, and tell to them, my secret, / That solved the riddle which I had proposed.
    • 1907, Robert Chambers, chapter 8, The Younger Set:
      “I never understood it,” she observed, lightly scornful. “What occult meaning has a sun-dial for a spooney ? I’m sure I don't want to read riddles into a strange gentleman’s optics.”
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VerbEdit

riddle (third-person singular simple present riddles, present participle riddling, simple past and past participle riddled)

  1. To speak ambiguously or enigmatically.
  2. (transitive) To solve, answer, or explicate a riddle or question
    Riddle me this, meaning Answer the following question.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English riddil, ridelle (sieve), from Old English hriddel (sieve), alteration of earlier hridder, hrīder, from Proto-Germanic *hridą (sieve), from Proto-Germanic *hrid- (to shake), from Proto-Indo-European *krey-. Akin to German Reiter (sieve), Old Norse hreinn (pure, clean), Old High German hreini (pure, clean), Gothic 𐌷𐍂𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (hrains, clean, pure). More at rinse.

NounEdit

riddle (plural riddles)

  1. A sieve with coarse meshes, usually of wire, for separating coarser materials from finer, as chaff from grain, cinders from ashes, or gravel from sand.
  2. A board with a row of pins, set zigzag, between which wire is drawn to straighten it.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

riddle (third-person singular simple present riddles, present participle riddling, simple past and past participle riddled)

  1. To put something through a riddle or sieve, to sieve, to sift.
    You have to riddle the gravel before you lay it on the road.
  2. To fill with holes like a riddle.
    The shots from his gun began to riddle the target.
  3. To fill or spread throughout; to pervade.
    Your argument is riddled with errors.
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AnagramsEdit