EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English rumpe, from Old Norse rumpr (rump), from Middle Low German rump (the bulk or trunk of a body, trunk of a tree), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *rumpō (trunk of a tree, log). Cognate with Icelandic rumpur (rump), Swedish rumpa (rump), Dutch romp (trunk, body, hull), German Rumpf (hull, trunk, torso, trunk).

In the sense of remnant, first attested in the Rump Parliament of 1648.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rump (plural rumps)

  1. the hindquarters of an animal
  2. a cut of meat from the rump
  3. the buttocks
  4. remnant, as in rump parliament

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse rumpr (rump), from Middle Low German rump (the bulk or trunk of a body, trunk of a tree), from Proto-Germanic *rumpō (trunk of a tree, log).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rump (plural rumps)

  1. (anatomy) rump
  2. a topside beef cut

Derived termsEdit

  • rump an stump (completely, wholly, in its entirety)
  • rumple (rump, tail, haunches, buttocks, seat)

VerbEdit

tae rump (third-person singular simple present rumps, present participle rumpin, simple past rumpit, past participle rumpit)

  1. to plunder, clean out of money
Last modified on 7 October 2013, at 18:41