Last modified on 23 September 2014, at 09:14

EnglishEdit

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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fin, from Old French fin (fine, minute, exact), probably, from Latin finitus (literally finished (used as an adjective by Cicero, of words, well rounded)), past participle of fīnīre (to limit, bound, define, terminate, finish), from finis (a limit, end).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fine (comparative finer, superlative finest)

  1. Of subjective quality.
    1. Of superior quality.
      The tree frog that they encountered was truly a fine specimen.   Only a really fine wine could fully complement Lucía's hand-made pasta.
    2. (informal) Being acceptable, adequate, passable, or satisfactory.
      "How are you today?" "Fine."   "Will this one do? It's got a dent in it" "Yeah, it'll be fine, I guess."   "It's fine with me if you stay out late, so long as you're back by three."
      • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 3, The Celebrity:
        Now all this was very fine, but not at all in keeping with the Celebrity's character as I had come to conceive it. The idea that adulation ever cloyed on him was ludicrous in itself. In fact I thought the whole story fishy, and came very near to saying so.
    3. (informal) Good-looking, attractive.
      "That man is so fine that I'd jump into his pants without a moment's hesitation."
      • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 10, The Mirror and the Lamp:
        It was a joy to snatch some brief respite, and find himself in the rectory drawing–room. Listening here was as pleasant as talking; just to watch was pleasant. The young priests who lived here wore cassocks and birettas; their faces were fine and mild, yet really strong, like the rector's face; and in their intercourse with him and his wife they seemed to be brothers.
    4. Subtle, delicately balanced.
      • The Independent
        The fine distinction between lender of last resort and a bail-out []
    5. (obsolete) Showy; overdecorated.
      • Matthew Arnold (1822-1888)
        He gratified them with occasional [] fine writing.
    6. Delicate; subtle; exquisite; artful; dexterous.
      • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
        The spider's touch, how exquisitely fine!
      • John Dryden (1631-1700)
        The nicest and most delicate touches of satire consist in fine raillery.
      • Thomas Gray (1716-1771)
        He has as fine a hand at picking a pocket as a woman.
  2. Of objective quality.
    1. Of a particular grade of quality, usually between very good and very fine, and below mint.
      The small scratch meant that his copy of X-Men #2 was merely fine when it otherwise would have been near mint.
    2. (of weather) Sunny and not raining.
      • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 23, The Mirror and the Lamp:
        If the afternoon was fine they strolled together in the park, very slowly, and with pauses to draw breath wherever the ground sloped upward. The slightest effort made the patient cough.
    3. Consisting of especially minute particulate; made up of particularly small pieces.
      Grind it into a fine powder.   When she touched the artifact, it collapsed into a heap of fine dust.
    4. Particularly slender; especially thin, narrow, or of small girth.
      The threads were so fine that you had to look through a magnifying glass to see them.
    5. Made of slender or thin filaments.
      They protected themselves from the small parasites with a fine wire mesh.
    6. Having a (specified) proportion of pure metal in its composition.
      coins nine tenths fine
  3. (cricket) Behind the batsman and at a small angle to the line between the wickets.
    [] to nudge it through the covers (or tickle it down to fine leg) for a four []
  4. (obsolete) Subtle; thin; tenuous.
    • Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
      The eye standeth in the finer medium and the object in the grosser.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
  • (made up of particularly small pieces): coarse
  • (made of slender or thin filaments): coarse
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdverbEdit

fine (comparative more fine, superlative most fine)

  1. expression of agreement
  2. well, nicely, in a positive way
    Everything worked out fine.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

fine (plural fines)

  1. Fine champagne; French brandy.
    • 1926, Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises, Scribner 2003, p. 14:
      We had dined at l'Avenue's, and afterward went to the Café de Versailles for coffee. We had several fines after the coffee, and I said I must be going.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, p. 18:
      He refilled his glass. ‘The fine is very good,’ he said.
  2. (usually in the plural) something that is fine; fine particles
    • They filtered silt and fines out of the soil.
Usage notesEdit

Particularly used in plural as fines of ground coffee beans in espresso making.

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

fine (third-person singular simple present fines, present participle fining, simple past and past participle fined)

  1. (transitive) to make finer, purer, or cleaner; to purify or clarify.
    to fine gold
    • Hobbes
      It hath been fined and refined by [] learned men.
  2. (intransitive) to become finer, purer, or cleaner.
  3. To make finer, or less coarse, as in bulk, texture, etc.
    to fine the soil
    (Can we find and add a quotation of L. H. Bailey to this entry?)
  4. To change by fine gradations.
    to fine down a ship's lines, i.e. to diminish her lines gradually
    • Browning
      I often sate at home / On evenings, watching how they fined themselves / With gradual conscience to a perfect night.
  5. (transitive) to clarify (wine and beer) by filtration.
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

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Old French fin (end), from Medieval Latin finis (a payment in settlement or tax)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fine (plural fines)

  1. A fee levied as punishment for breaking the law.
    • The fine for jay-walking has gone from two dollars to thirty in the last fifteen years.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, Internal Combustion[1]:
      The popular late Middle Ages fictional character Robin Hood, dressed in green to symbolize the forest, dodged fines for forest offenses and stole from the rich to give to the poor. But his appeal was painfully real and embodied the struggle over wood.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fine (third-person singular simple present fines, present participle fining, simple past and past participle fined)

  1. (transitive) To issue a fine as punishment to (someone).
    • She was fined a thousand dollars for littering, but she appealed.
  2. (intransitive) To pay a fine.
    • Hallam
      Men fined for the king's good will; or that he would remit his anger; women fined for leave to marry.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Italian fine ("end").

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fine (plural fines)

  1. (music) The end of a musical composition.
  2. (music) The location in a musical score that indicates the end of the piece, particularly when the piece ends somewhere in the middle of the score due to a section of the music being repeated.
Usage notesEdit

This word is virtually never used in speech and therefore essentially confined to musical notation.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Old French finer, French finir. See finish (transitive verb).

VerbEdit

fine (third-person singular simple present fines, present participle fining, simple past and past participle fined)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To finish; to cease.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To cause to cease; to stop.

NounEdit

fine (plural fines)

  1. (obsolete) End; conclusion; termination; extinction.
    • Spenser
      to see their fatal fine
    • Shakespeare
      Is this the fine of his fines?
  2. A final agreement concerning lands or rents between persons, as the lord and his vassal.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spelman to this entry?)
  3. (UK, law) A sum of money or price paid for obtaining a benefit, favor, or privilege, as for admission to a copyhold, or for obtaining or renewing a lease.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

fine

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of finar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of finar

EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

fine

  1. finally, at last
  2. in the final analysis, when all's said and done

FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fine

  1. feminine singular of fin

NounEdit

fine f (plural fines)

  1. (typography) thin space, non-breakable space
  2. a number of high grade French brandies (usually AOC certified)

External linksEdit


IdoEdit

AdverbEdit

fine

  1. finally

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish fine, from Proto-Celtic *weniyā (family), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (desire); compare Old English wine (friend).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fine f (genitive fine, nominative plural finte)

  1. family group

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fine fhine bhfine
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fīnis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fine m, f (masculine and feminine plural fini)

  1. thin
  2. fine
  3. refined

SynonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fine

  1. feminine plural of fino

NounEdit

fine f (plural fini)

  1. end

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

fine m (plural fini)

  1. aim, purpose, end
    il fine giustifica i mezzi - the ends justifies the means

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

fīne

  1. ablative singular of fīnis

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish faigen (sheath, scabbard), from Latin vāgīna.

NounEdit

fine f

  1. quiver
  2. sheath, scabbard
  3. vagina

SynonymsEdit


North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian finda, which derives from from Proto-Germanic *finþaną.

VerbEdit

fine

  1. (Mooring Dialect) to find

ConjugationEdit



NorwegianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fine

  1. Plural of fin.

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

fine

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of finar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of finar
  3. third-person singular imperative of finar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

fine

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of finir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of finir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of finir.

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fine

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of fin.