Last modified on 2 September 2014, at 01:31

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Old English tyltan "to be unsteady"; Middle English tilte. Cognate with Icelandic tölt (an ambling place). The nominal sense of "a joust" appears around 1510, presumably derived from the barrier which separated the combatants, which suggests connection with tilt "covering". The modern transitive meaning is from 1590, the intransitive use appears 1620.

VerbEdit

tilt (third-person singular simple present tilts, present participle tilting, simple past and past participle tilted)

  1. (transitive) To slope or incline (something); to slant [1590]
    Tilt the barrel to pour out its contents.
  2. (jousting) To charge (at someone) with a lance [1590]
    • William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet act III, scene I
      He tilts / With piercing steel at bold Mercutio's breast.
    • Tennyson
      But in this tournament can no man tilt.
  3. (intransitive) To be at an angle [1620]
  4. (transitive) To point or thrust a weapon at.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Beaumont and Fletcher to this entry?)
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act V, Scene V, verses 52-54
      I say I quarrell’d with you;
      We did not tilt each other, — that’s a blessing, —
      Good gods! no innocent blood upon my head!
  5. (transitive) To point or thrust (a weapon).
    • J. Philips
      Sons against fathers tilt the fatal lance.
  6. To forge (something) with a tilt hammer.
    to tilt steel in order to render it more ductile
  7. (poker) To play worse than usual (often as a result of previous bad luck).
  8. (photography) To move a camera vertically in a controlled way.
SynonymsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

tilt (plural tilts)

  1. a slope or inclination (uncountable)
  2. a jousting contest (countable) [1510]
  3. A thrust, as with a lance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)
  4. (photography) the controlled vertical movement of a camera, or a device to achieve this
  5. an attempt at something, such as a tilt at public office.
    • 2011 December 7, Phil McNulty, “Man City 2 - 0 Bayern Munich”, BBC Sport:
      City will now make the Premier League an even bigger priority, while regrouping and planning again for what they hope will be another tilt at the Champions League next season.
  6. tilt hammer

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English telt, from Old English teld (tent), from Middle Low German telt,[1] perhaps via or influenced by Danish telt.[2] Cognates include German Zelt (tent), Old Norse tjald (tent) (whence also archaic Danish tjæld (tent)). More at teld.

NounEdit

tilt (plural tilts)

  1. A canvas covering for carts, boats, etc. [1450]
  2. Any covering overhead; especially, a tent.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Denham to this entry?)

VerbEdit

tilt (third-person singular simple present tilts, present participle tilting, simple past and past participle tilted)

  1. (transitive) To cover with a tilt, or awning.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Etymology in ODS
  2. ^ tilt in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tilt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of tillen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of tillen

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tilt

  1. forbid, prohibit

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit