Last modified on 13 October 2014, at 18:12

mount

Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia

See also: Mount

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English, from Old English munt, from Latin mons (a hill, mountain), from a root seen also in ēmineō (I project, I protrude) (English eminent).

NounEdit

mount (plural mounts)

  1. A mountain.
  2. (obsolete) A bulwark for offence or defence; a mound.
    • Bible, Jer. vi. 6
      Hew ye down trees, and cast a mount against Jerusalem.
  3. (obsolete) A bank; a fund.
Usage notesEdit
  • Used chiefly in poetry, but also in the names of specific mountains, e.g. "Mount Everest".
Derived termsEdit
  • (abbreviation): Mt.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English mounten, from Anglo-Norman mounter, from Old French monter, from Medieval Latin montare (to mount; literally, go up hill), from Latin mons (a hill, mountain); compare French monter.

NounEdit

mount (plural mounts)

  1. An animal, usually a horse, used to ride on, unlike a draught horse
    The rider climbed onto his mount.
  2. A mounting; an object on which another object is mounted.
    The post is the mount on which the mailbox is installed.
  3. (obsolete) A rider in a cavalry unit or division.
    The General said he has 2,000 mounts.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

mount (third-person singular simple present mounts, present participle mounting, simple past and past participle mounted)

  1. To move upwards.
    1. (transitive) To get upon; to ascend; to climb.
      to mount stairs
      • John Dryden (1631-1700)
        Or shall we mount again the Rural Throne, / And rule the Country Kingdoms, once our own?
    2. (transitive) To place oneself on (a horse, a bicycle, etc.); to bestride.
      The rider mounted his horse.
    3. (transitive) To cause to mount; to put on horseback; to furnish with animals for riding.
    4. (obsolete, transitive) To cause (something) to rise or ascend; to drive up; to raise; to elevate; to lift up.
    5. (obsolete, intransitive) To rise on high; to go up; to be upraised or uplifted; to tower aloft; to ascend; often with up.
      • Bible, Jeremiah li. 53
        Though Babylon should mount up to heaven.
      • Mrs. Cowley (1743-1809)
        The fire of trees and houses mounts on high.
  2. (transitive) To attach (an object) to a support.
    to mount a mailbox on a post
    • 1879, Richard Jefferies, chapter 1, The Amateur Poacher:
      But then I had the [massive] flintlock by me for protection. ¶ [] The linen-press and a chest on the top of it formed, however, a very good gun-carriage; and, thus mounted, aim could be taken out of the window at the old mare feeding in the meadow below by the brook, [] .
    1. (transitive, computing) To attach (a drive or device) to the file system in order to make it available to the operating system.
      How do I mount this external hard disk?
  3. (intransitive, sometimes with up) To increase in quantity or intensity.
    The bills mounted up and the business failed.
    There is mounting tension in Crimea.
  4. (obsolete) To attain in value; to amount (to).
    • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
      Bring then these blessings to a strict account, / Make fair deductions, see to what they mount.
  5. (transitive) To get on top of (an animal) to mate.
    1. (transitive, slang) To have sexual intercourse with someone.
  6. (transitive) To begin (a military assault, etc.); to launch.
    The General gave the order to mount the attack.
    • 2012 May 5, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 2-1 Liverpool”, BBC Sport:
      For Liverpool, their season will now be regarded as a relative disappointment after failure to add the FA Cup to the Carling Cup and not mounting a challenge to reach the Champions League places.
  7. (transitive, archaic) To deploy (cannon) for use in or around it.
    to mount cannon
  8. (transitive) To prepare and arrange the scenery, furniture, etc. for use in (a play or production).
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit