Last modified on 8 December 2014, at 07:04

vagabond

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin vagabundus, from vagari, ‘wander’.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vagabond (plural vagabonds)

  1. A person on a trip of indeterminate destination and/or length of time.
  2. One who wanders from place to place, having no fixed dwelling, or not abiding in it, and usually without the means of honest livelihood; a vagrant; a hobo.
    • Bible, Genesis iv. 12
      A fugitive and a vagabond shalt thou be.

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

vagabond (third-person singular simple present vagabonds, present participle vagabonding, simple past and past participle vagabonded)

  1. To roam, as a vagabond

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vagabond (not comparable)

  1. Floating about without any certain direction; driven to and fro.
    • Milton
      To heaven their prayers / Flew up, nor missed the way, by envious winds / Blown vagabond or frustrate.
    • 1959, Jack London, The Star Rover
      Truly, the worships of the Mystery wandered as did men, and between filchings and borrowings the gods had as vagabond a time of it as did we.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vagabond m (feminine vagabonde, masculine plural vagabonds, feminine plural vagabondes)

  1. vagabonding

NounEdit

vagabond m (plural vagabonds)

  1. tramp (a homeless person)

External linksEdit


RomanianEdit

NounEdit

vagabond m (plural vagabonzi)

  1. tramp, (a homeless person)