Last modified on 12 July 2014, at 23:19

wander

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English wandren, wandrien, from Old English wandrian (to wander, roam, fly around, hover; change; stray, err), from Proto-Germanic *wandrōną (to wander), from Proto-Indo-European *wendʰ- (to turn, wind), equivalent to wend +‎ -er (frequentative suffix). Cognate with Scots wander (to wander), German wandern (to wander, roam, hike, migrate), Swedish vandra (to wander, hike).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

wander (third-person singular simple present wanders, present participle wandering, simple past and past participle wandered)

  1. (intransitive) To move without purpose or specified destination; often in search of livelihood.
    to wander over the fields
    • Bible, Heb. xi. 37
      They wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins.
  2. (intransitive) To stray; stray from one's course; err.
    A writer wanders from his subject.
    • Bible, Psalms cxix. 10
      O, let me not wander from thy commandments.
  3. (intransitive) To commit adultery.
  4. (intransitive) To go somewhere indirectly or at varying speeds; to move in a curved path.
  5. (intransitive) Of the mind, to lose focus or clarity of argument or attention.

SynonymsEdit

  • (move without purpose): err, roam
  • (commit adultery): cheat
  • (go somewhere indirectly):
  • (lose focus): drift

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

wander (plural wanders)

  1. The act or instance of wandering.
    To go for a wander

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

wander

  1. First-person singular present of wandern.
  2. Imperative singular of wandern.