See also: oter, oster, and -oter

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French and Old French oster, from Latin obstāre, present active infinitive of obstō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /o.te/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

ôter

  1. to take away, remove
  2. to take off, remove (clothes, etc.)
    • 1829, Victor Hugo, Le Dernier Jour d’un condamné
      Le guichetier de garde vient d’entrer dans mon cachot, il a ôté sa casquette, m’a salué, s’est excusé de me déranger et m’a demandé, en adoucissant de son mieux sa rude voix, ce que je désirais à déjeuner.
      The duty hatchman just came into my cell, took off his cap, gave me a salute, said he was sorry for bothering me and asked me, whispering as best he could with his rough voice, what I wanted for lunch.
  3. to remove, cut (text etc.); to take away (in arithmetic)
  4. to take (something) away from someone; to deprive
    • 1640, Pierre Corneille, “Act I, Scene 2”, in Horace:
      La guerre [] / Nous ôta tout
      The war [] / deprived us of everything
  5. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to move oneself, get out of the way

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French oster, from Latin obstō, obstāre, from ob (before, in front) + stō, stāre (stand).

VerbEdit

ôter

  1. (Jersey) to remove

AntonymsEdit