See also: Ob, OB, ÖB, ob-, Ob., ob., and об

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ob, abbreviation of obolus.

NounEdit

ob (plural obs)

  1. (historical) a halfpenny

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviations.

NounEdit

ob (plural obs)

  1. (archaic) an objection
  2. (genetics) the obese gene
Coordinate termsEdit
  • (objection): sol

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German obe, ob, from Proto-Germanic *jabai (when, if). Compare English if.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɔp/
  • (file)

ConjunctionEdit

ob

  1. (subordinating) if, whether
    ob ... oderif ... or

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle High German obe, from Old High German oba, from Proto-Germanic *ub (under), from Proto-Indo-European *upó (under, below). Related with über, oben. A chiefly southern word, pronounced with a short vowel in Alemannic areas and with a long vowel in Austro-Bavarian areas. In the north, the short vowel is from etymology 1, perhaps also reinforced by association with regional forms of auf (Central Franconian op, Low German up, op). The long vowel is standard in Obacht, beobachten.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɔp/ (German standard; Switzerland)
  • IPA(key): /oːp/ (Austria; Bavaria)

PrepositionEdit

ob

  1. (formal, literary, + dative or genitive) on account of
  2. (archaic or dialectal, + dative) over, above, on
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • ob in Duden online
  • ob in Duden online
  • ob” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₁epi. Cognate with Ancient Greek ἐπί (epí), Sanskrit अपि (ápi), Avestan 𐬀𐬌𐬞𐬌(aipi), Old Persian [script needed] (apiy), and Old Armenian եւ (ew). Also related to English by.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

ob (+ accusative)

  1. in the direction of, to, towards
  2. on account of, according to, because of, due to, for (the purpose of)
  3. against; facing

Usage notesEdit

  • The preposition ob is used as a combining prefix with many other words, particularly verbs. In compounds, the b is often assimilated into the next consonant, as in oppose.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: ob-

ReferencesEdit

  • ob in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ob in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ob in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • I blame this in you; I censure you for this: hoc in te reprehendo (not ob eam rem)

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *jabai (when, if), from Proto-Indo-European *e-, *ē- (then, at that time). Cognate with English if, West Frisian oft (whether), Dutch of (or, whether, but), Middle Low German ef (if, whether), German ob (if, whether), Icelandic ef, if (if).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ob

  1. if, whether
    Weess du, ob d'Apdikt muer op ass?
    Do you know if the pharmacy is open tomorrow?

NovialEdit

ParticleEdit

ob

  1. initial interrogative particle

ConjunctionEdit

ob

  1. (subordinating) whether or not, if

Old IrishEdit

NounEdit

ob f

  1. Alternative form of aub

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ob (plural obs)

  1. Alternative form of ab

VerbEdit

ob (third-person singular present obs, present participle obin, past obt, past participle obt)

  1. Alternative form of ab

ReferencesEdit


VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ob

  1. I (first-person singular, nominative)

DeclensionEdit


White HmongEdit

White Hmong cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : ob

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Hmong-Mien *ʔu̯i (two). Cognate with Iu Mien i.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

ob

  1. two

ReferencesEdit

  • Ernest E. Heimbach, White Hmong - English Dictionary (1979, SEAP Publications)