See also: thri, þri-, and þrí-

Old English

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Old English numbers (edit)
30
 ←  2 3 4  → 
    Cardinal: þrī
    Ordinal: þridda
    Adverbial: þreowa
    Multiplier: þrifeald

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *þrīz, from Proto-Indo-European *tréyes.

Cognate with Old High German drī, French trois, Ancient Greek τρεῖς (treîs), Russian три (tri).

Pronunciation

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Numeral

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þrī

  1. three

Usage notes

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  • The distinction between masculine þrī and feminine/neuter þrēo, shown in the declension table below, existed only in the West Saxon dialect. In the other dialects þrēo was used for all three genders.
  • The combining form (i.e., the form used as the first element of a compound) is þri-, with a short i: þrifeald (triple), þrimilċe (May), þrines (trinity), þriwintre (three years old). The word þrītiġ (thirty) is an exception, since it was originally a phrase meaning “three tens” and not a compound. See also twēġen, whose combining form is twi-.

Declension

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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Old Swedish

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Numeral

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þrī

  1. Alternative form of þrīr