Ancient Greek

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Etymology

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From Proto-Hellenic *kérats, probably remodeled from an earlier s-stem *kéras (like κᾰ́ρᾱ (kárā), κᾰ́ρηνον (kárēnon), κρᾱνίον (krāníon)), as preserved in e.g. κερασ-φόρος (keras-phóros, with a horn), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerh₂- (head, top; front of the skull; horn);[1] see there for more. An older etymology supposes Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-n̥t-.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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κέρας (kérasn (genitive κέρᾱτος or κέρᾰος or κέρως); third declension

  1. horn (of an animal)
  2. horn as a material, or anything made of horn, such as a bow.
  3. (music) horn (musical instrument)
  4. arm or branch of a river
  5. the side branch (either left or right) of a military array for battle.

Inflection

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κέρᾰς (kéras) was sometimes declined using the stem κέρᾰτ- (kérat-) and sometimes the stem κέρᾰ- (kéra-). Both are shown below.

Derived terms

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References

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  1. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010) “κέρας”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 676–677

Greek

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Etymology

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From Ancient Greek κέρας (kéras).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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κέρας (kérasn (plural κέρατα)

  1. (anatomy) horn
  2. (music) horn (wind instrument)

Declension

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Further reading

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