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Ancient GreekEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

According to Beekes, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeh₂it- (curly hair), the same root of Avestan 𐬔𐬀𐬉𐬯𐬀(gaēsa, curly hair) and Middle Irish gaiset (bristly hair).

PronunciationEdit

 

NounEdit

χαίτη (khaítēf (genitive χαίτης); first declension

  1. loose, flowing hair; used especially of back hair
  2. a mane of a horse or of a lion (also, metaphorically, of Aeschylus); opposed to λοφιά
  3. a helmet’s crest
  4. (figuratively, of trees) foliage

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • χαίτη in Liddell & Scott (1940) A Greek–English Lexicon, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • χαίτη in Liddell & Scott (1889) An Intermediate Greek–English Lexicon, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • χαίτη in Autenrieth, Georg (1891) A Homeric Dictionary for Schools and Colleges, New York: Harper and Brothers
  • χαίτη in Bailly, Anatole (1935) Le Grand Bailly: Dictionnaire grec-français, Paris: Hachette
  • χαίτη in Cunliffe, Richard J. (1924) A Lexicon of the Homeric Dialect: Expanded Edition, Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, published 1963
  • χαίτα in Slater, William J. (1969) Lexicon to Pindar, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter
  • Woodhouse, S. C. (1910) English–Greek Dictionary: A Vocabulary of the Attic Language[1], London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Limited.
    • fur idem, page 350.
    • hair idem, page 380.
    • mane idem, page 511.

GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from the Ancient Greek χαίτη (khaítē)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈçeti/
  • Hyphenation: χαί‧τη

NounEdit

χαίτη (chaítif (plural χαίτες)

  1. mane

DeclensionEdit