See also: ارز and أزر

Arabic

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أَرْزCedrus libani subsp. libani
 أرز (شجرة) on Arabic Wikipedia

Etymology 1

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The tree is native to the region north of Israel and Judea. Borrowed into Arabic and Ge'ez አርዝ (ʾärz) and before the pertinent vowel change into Hebrew אֶרֶז (ʾérez, cedar) from Aramaic אַרְזָא / ܐܪܙܐ (ʾarzā, cedar), also found in Ugaritic 𐎀𐎗𐎇 (ảrz, cedar), continuing Akkadian 𒄑𒂞 (GIŠERIN /⁠erēnu, erinnu⁠/) from Sumerian 𒄑𒂞 (GIŠERIN /⁠eren⁠/), which also passed into Hittite 𒄑𒂞 (GIŠERIN /⁠herin(a)-⁠/, cedar) and also Hurrian 𒄑𒂊𒊑𒅎𒁉 (GIŠe-ri-im-bi /⁠erimbi⁠/), 𒄑𒂊𒊑𒁉 (GIŠe-ri-bi /⁠eribi⁠/, cedar) and thence back into a Hittite alternative form. While Rabin argues for a Hittite origin of the word, the form ʾarz recalls Proto-Iranian *hampr̥sā (juniper), which is not remote in meaning – Ancient Greek κέδρος (kédros) also means both cedar and juniper.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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أَرْز (ʔarzm (collective, singulative أَرْزَة f (ʔarza))

  1. cedar (Cedrus gen. et spp.)
    • c. 1200, يحيى بن محمد بن أحمد بن العوام [yaḥyā ibn muḥammad ibn ʔaḥmad ibn al-ʕawwām], edited by José Antonio Banqueri, كتاب الفلاحة [Book on Agriculture], volume 1, Madrid: Imprenta Real, published 1802IA, Cap. 7, Art. 22, page 287:
      وأما غراسة الأرز وهو الذي يسمى السرول
      قال هو نوعان أحدهما يشبه الطرفاء والآخر يشبه العرعر
      About the planting of the cedar which is called cypress
      there are two kinds, one resembles the tamarisk and the other resembles the juniper.
    • c. 1200, يحيى بن محمد بن أحمد بن العوام [yaḥyā ibn muḥammad ibn ʔaḥmad ibn al-ʕawwām], edited by José Antonio Banqueri, كتاب الفلاحة [Book on Agriculture], volume 2, Madrid: Imprenta Real, published 1802IA, Cap. 34, Art. 6, pages 721–722:
      وقال غيره يتخذ لها الخلايا من خشب الأرز ومن طين طيب الريح وتطين الخلايا من خارجها برماد وأخثاء البقر مدقوق معجون بالماء ويتخذ لها بعض الناس الخلايا من قشور الشبر وتسميه العامة «جناحا»
      And another author said that for beehives cedar wood and clay of good smell is taken and the beehives are daubed from the outside with ash and cow dung powdered and kneaded with water, and some people take for beehives the barks of the cork oak, generally called “wings”.
Declension
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أَرُزّ
 
أَرُزّ

Etymology 2

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From Ancient Greek ὄρυζα (óruza).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ʔa.ruzz/ and IPA(key): /ʔu.ruzz/
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

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أَرُزّ or أُرُزّ (ʔaruzz or ʔuruzzm

  1. (uncountable) rice
Declension
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Synonyms
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Descendants
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  • Ottoman Turkish: ارز (ürüz, erz)

Etymology 3

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Of onomatopoeic origin from a ringing telephone. At its time one also employed إِرْزِيز (ʔirzīz) for the new device of a telephone.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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أَرَزَّ (ʔarazza) IV, non-past يُرِزُّ‎ (yurizzu) (obsolete)

  1. to telephone, to ring up
Conjugation
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Etymology 4

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Verb

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أَرُزُّ (ʔaruzzu) (form I)

  1. first-person singular non-past active indicative of رَزَّ (razza)

Verb

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أَرُزَّ (ʔaruzza) (form I)

  1. first-person singular non-past active subjunctive of رَزَّ (razza)
  2. first-person singular non-past active jussive of رَزَّ (razza)

Verb

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أَرُزِّ (ʔaruzzi) (form I)

  1. first-person singular non-past active jussive of رَزَّ (razza)

Verb

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أُرَزُّ (ʔurazzu) (form I)

  1. first-person singular non-past passive indicative of رَزَّ (razza)

Verb

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أُرَزَّ (ʔurazza) (form I)

  1. first-person singular non-past passive subjunctive of رَزَّ (razza)
  2. first-person singular non-past passive jussive of رَزَّ (razza)

Verb

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أُرَزِّ (ʔurazzi) (form I)

  1. first-person singular non-past passive jussive of رَزَّ (razza)

References

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  • Löw, Immanuel (1924–1934) Die Flora der Juden[1] (in German), Wien und Leipzig: R. Löwit, pages 17–26
  • Nöldeke, Theodor (1910) Neue Beiträge zur semitischen Sprachwissenschaft[2] (in German), Straßburg: Karl J. Trübner, page 43, noting it is rare in pre-classical Arabic and Arabic savants struggle to define it as they do not know the tree.
  • Puhvel, Jaan (1984–) Hittite Etymological Dictionary (Trends in linguistics. Documentation), volume 3, page 301
  • Rabin, Chaim (1965) “Millīm ḥittiyōṯ bəʿiḇrīṯ”, in Sefer Segal (in Hebrew), Jerusalem: Kiryat Sefer, page 164–165 of 151–179 according to Leslau, Wolf (1991) “አርዝ”, in Comparative Dictionary of Geʿez (Classical Ethiopic), 2nd edition, Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, →ISBN, page 41a
  • The template Template:R:uga:Watson:2004 does not use the parameter(s):
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    Watson, Wilfred G. E. (2004) “A Botanical Snapshot of Ugaritic”, in Aula Orientalis[3], volume 22, number 1, Barcelona, page 113
  • “eren [CEDAR]”, in The Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary[4], University of Pennsylvania, 2006

South Levantine Arabic

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Etymology

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From Arabic أَرْز (ʔarz).

Noun

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أرز (ʔarzm (collective, singulative أرزة f (ʔarze), paucal أرزات (ʔarzāt))

  1. (collective) cedars