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See also: lings

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English -linges, variant (with genitive -es) of Middle English -ling (adverbial suffix), equivalent to -ling +‎ -s. Compare Dutch -lings (adverbial suffix), German -lings.

SuffixEdit

-lings

  1. (now Britain dialectal) forming adverbs, generally of condition or situation

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

The suffix is a combination of the suffix -ling and the adverb-forming -s.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

SuffixEdit

-lings

  1. describes a manner in which an action proceeds as defined by root to which it is added, both as adverb and as adjective
    Hij dook zijdelings weg.He ducked away sideways.

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German -lingen, from Old High German lingūn. The modern form with -s is of Central and Low German origin; compare Middle Low German -linges.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-lings

  1. (rare, not productive) forms adverbs that describe the manner of an action, particularly a movement
    Bauch (abdomen, belly) + ‎-lings → ‎bäuchlings (on one’s belly)
    blind (blind) + ‎-lings → ‎blindlings (blindly, hastily, pell-mell)
    Ritt (ride) + ‎-lings → ‎rittlings (astride, sitting on something like on a mount)
    Rücken (back) + ‎-lings → ‎rücklings (one one’s back)

Usage notesEdit

  • The suffix was common and productive into early modern German. Most adverbs with it, apart from the four named above, are now archaic.

Derived termsEdit