See also: Blind

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English blynd, from Old English blind, from Proto-West Germanic *blind, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /blaɪnd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

AdjectiveEdit

blind (comparative blinder, superlative blindest)

  1. (not comparable, of a person or animal) Unable to see, due to physiological or neurological factors.
    Synonym: sightless
    Antonyms: seeing, sighted
    Even a blind hen sometimes finds a grain of corn.
    Braille is a writing system for the blind.
  2. (not comparable, of an eye) Unable to be used to see, due to physiological or neurological factors.
  3. (comparable) Failing to see, acknowledge, perceive.
    The lovers were blind to each other's faults.
    Authors are blind to their own defects.
  4. (not comparable) Of a place, having little or no visibility.
    a blind path
    a blind ditch
    a blind corner
  5. (not comparable) Closed at one end; having a dead end; exitless.
    a blind fistula
    • 1914, James Joyce, Araby:
      North Richmond street, being blind, was a quiet street except at the hour when the Christian Brothers' School set the boys free.
  6. (not comparable) Having no openings for light or passage; both dark and exitless.
    a blind wall
    a blind alley
  7. (in certain phrases, chiefly in the negative) Smallest or slightest.
    I shouted, but he didn't take a blind bit of notice.
    We pulled and pulled, but it didn't make a blind bit of difference.
  8. (not comparable) Without any prior knowledge.
    He took a blind guess at which fork in the road would take him to the airport.
    I went into the meeting totally blind, so I really didn't have a clue what I was talking about.
  9. (not comparable) Unconditional; without regard to evidence, logic, reality, accidental mistakes, extenuating circumstances, etc.
    blind deference
    blind justice
    blind punishment
    • 1787–1788, John Jay, The Federalist Papers
      This plan is recommended neither to blind approbation nor to blind reprobation.
  10. (sciences) Using blinded study design, wherein information is purposely limited to prevent bias.
    a blind trial
  11. Unintelligible or illegible.
    a blind passage in a book; blind writing
  12. (horticulture) Abortive; failing to produce flowers or fruit.
    blind buds
    blind flowers
  13. (LGBT, slang) Uncircumcised[1]

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

blind (plural blinds)

 
A destination blind (sense 2) on the side of a London bus
  1. A covering for a window to keep out light. The covering may be made of cloth or of narrow slats that can block light or allow it to pass.
    • 1956, Delano Ames, chapter 12, in Crime out of Mind[1]:
      Light filtered in through the blinds of the french windows. It made tremulous stripes along the scrubbed pine floor.
  2. A destination sign mounted on a public transport vehicle displaying the route destination, number, name and/or via points, etc.
  3. Any device intended to conceal or hide.
    a duck blind
  4. Something to mislead the eye or the understanding, or to conceal some covert deed or design; a subterfuge.
  5. (military) A blindage.
  6. A hiding place.
    • 1697, “The Fourth Book of the Æneis”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 403869432:
      So, when the watchful shepherd, from the blind,
      Wounds with a random shaft the careless hind
  7. (rugby, colloquial) The blindside.
  8. (baseball, slang, 1800s) No score.
  9. (poker) A forced bet: the small blind or the big blind.
    The blinds are $10 and $20, and the ante is $1.
  10. (poker) A player who is forced to pay such a bet.
    The blinds immediately folded when I reraised.

SynonymsEdit

  • (destination sign): rollsign (mainly US)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

blind (third-person singular simple present blinds, present participle blinding, simple past and past participle blinded)

  1. (transitive) To make temporarily or permanently blind.
    The light was so bright that for a moment he was blinded.
    Don't wave that pencil in my face - do you want to blind me?
    • May 9, 1686 (date of preaching), Robert South, The Fatal Imposture and Force of Words (sermon)
      A blind guide is certainly a great mischief; but a guide that blinds those whom he should lead is [] a much greater.
  2. (slang, obsolete) To curse.
    • 1890, Rudyard Kipling, The Young British Soldier
      If you're cast for fatigue by a sergeant unkind,
      Don't grouse like a woman, nor crack on, nor blind;
      Be handy and civil, and then you will find
      That it's beer for the young British soldier.
  3. To darken; to obscure to the eye or understanding; to conceal.
  4. To cover with a thin coating of sand and fine gravel, for example a road newly paved, in order that the joints between the stones may be filled.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

blind (comparative more blind, superlative most blind)

  1. Without seeing; unseeingly.
    • 1899 Feb, Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness”, in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, page 196:
      It was just robbery with violence, aggravated murder on a great scale, and men going at it blind - as is very proper for those who tackle a darkness.
  2. (colloquial) Absolutely, totally.
    to swear blind
    • 1899 Feb, Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness”, in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, page 195:
      It was just robbery with violence, aggravated murder on a great scale, and men going at it blind - as is very proper for those who tackle a darkness.
  3. (poker, three card brag) Without looking at the cards dealt.
  4. (cooking, especially in combination with 'bake') As a pastry case only, without any filling.
    Blind bake your pie case for fifteen minutes, then add the filling. This will help avoid a "soggy bottom".

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A. F. Niemoeller, "A Glossary of Homosexual Slang," Fact 2, no. 1 (Jan-Feb 1965): 25

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch blind, from Middle Dutch blint, from Old Dutch *blint, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blind (attributive blinde, comparative blinder, superlative blindste)

  1. blind (unable to see)

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blind

  1. blind

InflectionEdit

Inflection of blind
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular blind mere blind mest blind2
Neuter singular blindt mere blind mest blind2
Plural blinde mere blind mest blind2
Definite attributive1 blinde mere blind mest blinde
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch blint, from Old Dutch *blint, from Proto-West Germanic *blind, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

AdjectiveEdit

blind (comparative blinder, superlative blindst)

  1. blind (unable to see)
    Hij is sinds zijn geboorte blind.
    He has been blind since his birth.
InflectionEdit
Inflection of blind
uninflected blind
inflected blinde
comparative blinder
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial blind blinder het blindst
het blindste
indefinite m./f. sing. blinde blindere blindste
n. sing. blind blinder blindste
plural blinde blindere blindste
definite blinde blindere blindste
partitive blinds blinders
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: blind
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: blende
  • Negerhollands: blind, blin, blen

Etymology 2Edit

From blinden.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

blind n (plural blinden, diminutive blindje n)

  1. window shutter
SynonymsEdit

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German and Old High German blint, from Proto-West Germanic *blind.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blind (comparative blinder, superlative am blindesten)

  1. blind
  2. (of a mirror or windowpane) cloudy
    • 1918, Elisabeth von Heyking, Die Orgelpfeifen, in: Zwei Erzählungen, Phillipp Reclam jun. Verlag, page 9:
      So dunkel und schauerlich die Gruft aussah, wenn man durch die blinden, bestaubten Scheibchen der kleinen Fenster hineinblickte, so hell und freundlich war oben die Kirche.
      Just as dark and eerie the crypt looked like, if one looked in it through the cloudy, dusted little panes of the small windows, as bright and friendly was the church above.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • blind” in Duden online

German Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German blint, from Old Saxon blind. Cognate to Dutch blind, German blind.

AdjectiveEdit

blind (comparative blinner, superlative blinnst)

  1. blind

DeclensionEdit


IcelandicEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blind

  1. inflection of blindur:
    1. feminine singular nominative strong positive degree
    2. neuter plural nominative strong positive degree
    3. neuter plural accusative strong positive degree

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

AdjectiveEdit

blind (neuter singular blindt, definite singular and plural blinde)

  1. blind

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz. Akin to English blind.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blind (masculine and feminine blind, neuter blindt, definite singular and plural blinde, comparative blindare, indefinite superlative blindast, definite superlative blindaste)

  1. blind

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

blind

  1. imperative of blinda

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *blind.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blind

  1. blind
    blind, dēaf, and dumb
    blind, deaf, and dumb
    God is dēad and man is blind.
    God is dead and man is blind.
  2. (substantive) a blind person

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *blind.

AdjectiveEdit

blind

  1. blind

DeclensionEdit



SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish blinder, from Old Norse blindr, from Proto-Germanic *blindaz.

AdjectiveEdit

blind (comparative blindare, superlative blindast)

  1. blind; unable or failing to see

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of blind
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular blind blindare blindast
Neuter singular blint blindare blindast
Plural blinda blindare blindast
Masculine plural3 blinde blindare blindast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 blinde blindare blindaste
All blinda blindare blindaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Derived termsEdit