English

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Sign at the entrance to Arthur, Ontario

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From the name of the legendary king, from Middle English Arthure, from Medieval Latin Arthurus, probably from Middle Welsh arth (bear).

Other suggestions include Old Welsh arth (bear) and ur (man), or a Latinized (Romano-British) name; compare Latin Artorius, itself possibly of Etruscan origin, or more likely Messapic-Illyrian related to Proto-Albanian *artsa (bear).

Proper noun

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Arthur

  1. A male given name from the Celtic languages.
    • c. 1596 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act IV, scene ii]:
      : Act IV, Scene II:
      Young Arthur is alive: this hand of mine / Is yet a maiden and an innocent hand, / Not painted with the crimson spots of blood.
    • 1951, Graham Greene, The End of the Affair, Viking Press, page 96:
      "Is his name Arthur?" "Arthur James." "It’s quite an old-fashioned name." "We’re an old-fashioned family. His mother was fond of Tennyson."
    • 1966, Patrick White, The Solid Mandala, Avon Books, published 1975, →ISBN, page 270:
      "It will not be his only name," Mr. Saporta said, and his glance hoped he had found an acceptable solution. "We shall also call him 'Aaron'. That will be his Jewish name. But for everyday purposes—Arthur."
  2. A surname originating as a patronymic.
  3. A number of places in the United States:
    1. A village in Douglas County and Moultrie County, Illinois.
    2. A census-designated place in Patoka Township, Pike County, Indiana.
    3. A minor city in Ida County, Iowa.
    4. A village, the county seat of Arthur County, Nebraska.
    5. A ghost town in Elko County, Nevada.
    6. A minor city in Cass County, North Dakota.
    7. An unincorporated community in Paulding County, Ohio.
    8. A ghost town in Stephens County, Oklahoma.
    9. An unincorporated community in Claiborne County, Tennessee.
    10. An unincorporated community in Grant County, West Virginia.
    11. A town in Chippewa County, Wisconsin.
    12. An unincorporated community in the town of Lima, Grant County, Wisconsin.
  4. A former rural municipality in Manitoba, Canada, now part of the municipality of Two Borders.
  5. A community of Wellington North township, Wellington County, Ontario, Canada, named after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington.
Usage notes
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  • In continuous use as a given name since early Middle Ages. Popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
Derived terms
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pet forms
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Translations
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References

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  1. ^ Hall, Joseph Sargent (1942 March 2) “3. The Consonants”, in The Phonetics of Great Smoky Mountain Speech (American Speech: Reprints and Monographs; 4), New York: King's Crown Press, →DOI, →ISBN, § 2, page 89.

Etymology 2

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After Arthur Guinness, a famous brewer.

Noun

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Arthur (uncountable)

  1. (Ireland, informal) Guinness stout.
Usage notes
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  • Often said as a "pint of Arthur".

(Arthurian legend)

Anagrams

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Cebuano

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Etymology

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From English Arthur.

Proper noun

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Arthur

  1. a male given name from English [in turn from the Celtic languages]

Danish

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Etymology

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From English.

Proper noun

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Arthur m

  1. a male given name from English

Dutch

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Etymology

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Ultimately from Middle French Arthur.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɑrtyr/, [ˈɑrtyːr]
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: Ar‧thur

Proper noun

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Arthur m

  1. a male given name from English

Derived terms

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French

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Etymology

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Equivalent to English Arthur, used in France since the Middle Ages.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Arthur m

  1. a male given name
    • 1862, Victor Hugo, chapter 2, in Les Misérables, Tome I : Fantine, book 4; republished as Isabel F. Hapgood, transl., 1887:
      Il n’est pas rare aujourd’hui que le garçon bouvier se nomme Arthur, Alfred ou Alphonse, et que le vicomte — s’il y a encore des vicomtes — se nomme Thomas, Pierre ou Jacques. Ce déplacement qui met le nom « élégant » sur le plébéien et le nom campagnard sur l’aristocrate n’est autre chose qu’un remous d’égalité. L’irrésistible pénétration du souffle nouveau est là comme en tout.
      It is not rare for the neatherd's boy nowadays to bear the name of Arthur, Alfred, or Alphonse, and for the vicomte--if there are still any vicomtes--to be called Thomas, Pierre, or Jacques. This displacement, which places the "elegant" name on the plebeian and the rustic name on the aristocrat, is nothing else than an eddy of equality. The irresistible penetration of the new inspiration is there as everywhere else.
  2. (Arthurian legend) King Arthur
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Descendants

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  • Arabic: آرثر
  • Japanese: アルテュール (Arutyūru)

German

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English in the 18th century.

Pronunciation

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Proper noun

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Arthur m

  1. a male given name from English

Middle English

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Proper noun

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Arthur

  1. Alternative form of Arthure

Norman

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Proper noun

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Arthur m

  1. a male given name

Norwegian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English in the 19th century.

Proper noun

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Arthur m

  1. a male given name from English

Portuguese

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Proper noun

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Arthur m

  1. (Brazil) Alternative spelling of Artur
  2. (Portugal) Dated spelling of Artur.