See also: chian

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Chios +‎ -an.

AdjectiveEdit

Chian (comparative more Chian, superlative most Chian)

  1. Of or pertaining to Chios, an island in the Aegean Sea.
    • 1740, John Dyer, “The Ruins of Rome. A Poem.”, in Poems. [...] Viz. I. Grongar Hill. II. The Ruins of Rome. III. The Fleece, in Four Books, London: Printed by John Hughs, for Messrs. R[obert] and J[ames] Dodsley, [], published 1759, OCLC 991281870, pages 42–43:
      Tyrian garbs, / Neptunian Albion's high teſtaceous food [i.e., oysters], / And flavour'd Chian wines with incenſe fum'd / To ſlake Patrician thirſt: for theſe, their rights / In the vile ſtreets they proſtitute to ſale; / Their ancient rights, their dignities, their laws, / Their native glorious freedom.

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

Chian (plural Chians)

  1. A native or inhabitant of Chios.
    Synonym: Chiot

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Hakka (quán).

Proper nounEdit

Chian

  1. A surname, from Hakka.

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Chian

  1. Lenited form of Cian.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for Chian in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)