Constantinopolis

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Cōnstantīnopolis, from Ancient Greek Κωνστᾰντῑνούπολῐς (Kōnstantīnoúpolis).

Proper nounEdit

Constantinopolis

  1. Alternative form of Constantinople
    • 1938, H. P. Lovecraft, “Ibid” in The O-Wash-Ta-Nong: An Amateur Journal, volume 3, number 1, page 11:
      About 541 he removed to Constantinopolis, where he received every mark of imperial favour both from Justinianus and Justinus the Second.
    • 1999, Suraiya Faroqhi, Approaching Ottoman History: An Introduction to the Sources, page 124:
      Thus the Roman emperor Severus had destroyed the Hellenistic city; as to the emperor Constantine, he tore down pagan monuments to rebuild Byzantium as Constantinopolis, the capital of a Christian empire.
    • 2014, Sarah Bassett, “Collecting and the Creation of History” in Museum Archetypes and Collecting in the Ancient World, page 154:
      Like the monuments culled from the cities and sanctuaries of the Roman world, the relics of Constantinopolis created a history for the city both through individual identity and their status as appropriated objects.
    • 2015, Lucy Grig, “Competing Capitals” in Two Romes: Rome and Constantinople in Late Antiquity, page 43:
      Nonetheless, in the fourth century, Roma began to appear in a new guise, in a whole series of official images from coins to consular diptychs, more or less twinned with her upstart “sister”, Constantinopolis.

LatinEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Koine Greek Κωνστᾰντῑνούπολῐς (Kōnstantīnoúpolis), from Ancient Greek πόλῐς (pólis, city) + Κωνστᾰντῑ́νου (Kōnstantī́nou, of Constantine), a name borrowed from Latin Cōnstantīnus, from cōnstāns (constant, steadfast).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Cōnstantīnopolis f sg (genitive Cōnstantīnopolis or Cōnstantīnopoleos or Cōnstantīnopolios); third declension

  1. (Late Latin) Constantinople; ancient city on the Bosporus founded as Byzantium c. 660 BC, rechristened as Constantine's new imperial capital of the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantine Empire, named Constantinople from c. AD 330 to 1930; now called Istanbul

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (i-stem, partially Greek-type), with locative, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Cōnstantīnopolis
Genitive Cōnstantīnopolis
Cōnstantīnopoleos
Cōnstantīnopolios
Dative Cōnstantīnopolī
Accusative Cōnstantīnopolim
Cōnstantīnopolin
Ablative Cōnstantīnopolī
Vocative Cōnstantīnopolis
Cōnstantīnopolī
Locative Cōnstantīnopolī

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Constantinopolis

  1. Alternative form of Constantinople
    • (a. 1387), Trev.Higd.(StJ-C H.1) 1.179:
      Constantinopolis..was somtyme þe cheef citee of þe Est, riʒt as Rome was of þe West.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)