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Etymology

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From Romanian Dâmbovița.

Proper noun

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Dâmbovița

  1. A river in Romania.
    Synonym: Dâmbovița River
    • 1932, Joseph Slabey Rouček, Contemporary Roumania and Her Problems: A Study in Modern Nationalism, California: Stanford University Press, []; London: Humphrey Milford, Oxford University Press, page 271:
      Oil is found in the whole region of the Carpathian foothills on the Old Roumanian side from the district of Suceava in the north to the valley of the Dâmbovița in the south, a distance of nearly two hundred miles.
    • 2004, Romanian Journal of Mineral Deposits, page 48:
      Near Gemenea (Dâmbovița river) the archaeological data mention a pre-Roman Gethyc site (IV century B.C.) with an activity of extraction of gold from the Dâmbovița alluvial sands (Pârvari, 1967, pg 95) and possibly from Pleistocene Cândești gravels.
    • 2004, Steve Kokker, Cathryn Kemp, Romania & Moldova (Lonely Planet)‎[1], 3rd edition, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 135:
      Cotroceni Palace (Şos Cotroceni 1) lies along the western bank of the Dâmbovița River.
    • 2009, Gordon Kerr, Timeline of Kings & Queens[2], Canary Press, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 84:
      1532 England Sir Thomas More resigns over Henry’s divorce. Wallachia Vlad the Drowned is so named after he gets drunk and rides into the Dâmbovița river, where he drowns; Vlad Vintilă de la Slatina becomes prince.
    • 2015, Troy R Lovata, Elizabeth Olton, Understanding Graffiti: Multidisciplinary Studies from Prehistory to the Present[3], Routledge, →ISBN, →LCCN, →OCLC, page 79:
      This is the narrowest crossing point from north to south of the entire valley, and thus is the best location in the Dâmbovița River valley to control traffic from the Danube Plain northward toward the Carpathians and Transylvania.
    • 2013, Adrian-Silvan Ionescu, “Romanian Architecture and Cityscape: The Legacy of Nineteenth-Century Photographers”, in Micheline Nilsen, editor, Nineteenth-Century Photographs and Architecture: Documenting History, Charting Progress, and Exploring the World, Ashgate Publishing, →ISBN, pages 220–221:
      Angerer also documented the desolate banks of the winding Dâmbovița, the muddy rivulet that divided the Wallachian capital and flooded almost every spring. He captured the contrast between the tanners’ workshops and shanties flanking the Dâmbovița and the imposing public buildings recently erected nearby.
    • 2019, Spencer F. Coca, “Piatra Craiului Mountains: Grind Pit (Avenul de Sub Coltii Grindului)”, in Gheorghe M. L. Ponta, Bogdan P. Onac, editors, Cave and Karst Systems of Romania, Springer International Publishing AG, →ISBN, “Geographic and Geologic Settings”, page 73:
      From a geomorphological point of view, Piatra Craiului Mountains represent a 20 km ridge oriented NE-SW, separated from the surrounding mountain units by the Bran–Rucăr corridor (east), the Dâmbovița and Tămaș basins in the west, the Brașov Basin (north), and the Dâmbovicioara Basin to the south. The hydrologic drainage of the area is controlled by the Bârsa River and its main tributary, Râul Mare in the north, and Dâmbovița and Dâmbovicioara rivers in the south.
  2. A county in southern Romania.

Translations

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Romanian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Old Church Slavonic *дѫбовица (*dǫbovica, [river] of the oak trees), from дѫбъ (dǫbŭ, oak) + -овъ (-ovŭ, possessive suffix) + -ица (-ica, deadjectival suffix), from Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ + *-ovъ + *-ica.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈdɨmbovitsa/
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Proper noun

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Dâmbovița

  1. Dâmbovița (a river in Romania)
  2. Dâmbovița (a county in southern Romania)
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See also

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