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See also: gaia

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
British scientist, environmentalist, and futurist James Lovelock, c. 1960. Lovelock first used the word Gaia to describe the ecosystem of the Earth regarded as a self-regulating organism (sense 1).

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Γαῖᾰ (Gaîa, Gaea, the Earth personified as a goddess), from γαῖᾰ (gaîa, the Earth), probably related to γῆ (, earth, land; country).

Sense 1 was coined by the British scientist, environmentalist, and futurist James Lovelock (born 1919), at the suggestion of the British novelist, playwright, and poet William Golding (1911–1993).[1]

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Gaia

  1. (ecology) The ecosystem of the Earth regarded as a self-regulating organism. [from 20th c.]
  2. (Greek mythology) Alternative form of Gaea (Greek goddess personifying the Earth).

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gaia” (US) / “Gaia” (UK) in Oxford Dictionaries, Oxford University Press.

Further readingEdit


FinnishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Gaia

  1. (Greek mythology) Gaea

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of Gaia (Kotus type 12/kulkija, no gradation)
nominative Gaia
genitive Gaian
partitive Gaiaa
illative Gaiaan
singular plural
nominative Gaia
accusative nom. Gaia
gen. Gaian
genitive Gaian
partitive Gaiaa
inessive Gaiassa
elative Gaiasta
illative Gaiaan
adessive Gaialla
ablative Gaialta
allative Gaialle
essive Gaiana
translative Gaiaksi
instructive
abessive Gaiatta
comitative

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Feminine form of Gāius.

Proper nounEdit

Gāia f (genitive Gāiae); first declension

  1. A feminine praenomen.

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular
nominative Gāia
genitive Gāiae
dative Gāiae
accusative Gāiam
ablative Gāiā
vocative Gāia

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Gaia f

  1. (Greek mythology) Gaea (the earth, daughter of Chaos)