Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/tata-

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This Proto-Indo-European entry contains reconstructed terms and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Indo-EuropeanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of imitative origin, echoing baby talk.[1]

NounEdit

*tata- m

  1. dad, father
    Synonyms: *átta, *ph₂tḗr

DescendantsEdit

  • Proto-Albanian: *tatā
  • Proto-Anatolian:[3][4]
    • Luwian:
      Anatolian Hieroglyphs: [Anatolian Hieroglyphs needed] (tá-ti-sa /tátisa/, father, nom. sg.)
      Cuneiform: 𒋫𒀀𒋾𒅖 (ta-a-ti-iš /tātiš/, father, nom. sg.)
    • Lycian: 𐊗𐊁𐊅𐊆 (tedi, father, nom. sg.)
    • Lydian: 𐤯𐤠𐤠𐤣𐤠𐤮(taadaś, father, nom. sg.)
  • Proto-Armenian: *tat(a) (grandmother; midwife; father)[5]
  • Proto-Balto-Slavic: *tata-
    • Proto-Baltic: *tet-ia-, *tẽt-iã- (e-vocalism)
    • Proto-Slavic: *tata (dad, daddy)[6] (see there for further descendants)
  • Proto-Celtic: *tato- (father)[7]
    • Proto-Brythonic: *tad (see there for further descendants)
    • Old Irish: data (foster father)
  • Proto-Germanic:
    • Proto-West Germanic:
    • Old Norse:
  • Proto-Hellenic: *tata
  • Proto-Indo-Iranian: *tatás, *tātás
    • Proto-Indo-Aryan: *tatás, *tātás
      • Vedic Sanskrit: तत (tatá)
        • Sanskrit: तात (tātá) (see there for further descendants)
    • Proto-Iranian: *tatáh, *tātáh
      • Central Iranian:
        • Old Avestan: 𐬙𐬁(, father)
      • Northeastern Iranian:
        • Wakhi: طاط(tat, father)
        • Yagnobi: dodo (father)
      • Southeastern Iranian:
      • Western Iranian:
        • Northwestern Iranian:
          • Baluchi: دادا(dada, grandfather)
          • Proto-Medo-Parthian: *dada
            • Eshtehardi: دادا(dādā, father)
            • Talysh: dada (father)
            • Zazaki: ded (father's brother), dedo (voc.)
        • Southwestern Iranian:
          • Northern Luri: تاته(uncle, tāta)
    • Proto-Nuristani: *tā́ta, *tā́tta
  • Proto-Italic: *tata
    • Latin: tata (dad, daddy) (see there for further descendants)

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “tato”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, pages 372-73
  2. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “tatë”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 450
  3. ^ Puhvel, Jaan (1984), “*atta-”, in Hittite Etymological Dictionary (Trends in linguistics. Documentation; 1), volume 1, Berlin, New York, Amsterdam: Mouton, pages 224–226
  4. ^ Kloekhorst, Alwin (2008), “atta-”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 225–226
  5. ^ Martirosyan, Hrach (2010), “*tat(a)”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Armenian Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 8), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 603
  6. ^ Chernykh, Pavel (1999), “тя́тя”, in Историко-этимологический словарь русского языка [Historical-Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language] (in Russian), volume 2, 3rd reprint edition, Moscow: Russian Language, page 278
  7. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*tato-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 372–373
  8. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010), “τατᾶ”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), volume II, with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 1455