See also: Dodo, dodó, dodô, dödö, and do do

English edit

 
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A dodo

Etymology 1 edit

Uncertain. Perhaps from obsolete Portuguese doudo (fool, simpleton, silly, stupid) or Dutch dodaars. First attested in the 17th century.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dodo (plural dodoes or dodos)

  1. A large, flightless bird, †Raphus cucullatus, related to the pigeon, that is now extinct (since the 1600s) and was native to Mauritius.
    • 1835, Charles Lyell, chapter XLI, in Principles of Geology [] , 4th edition, volume III, London: John Murray, Book III, pages 133–134:
      In spite of the most active search, during the last century, no information respecting the dodo was obtained, and some authors have gone so far as to pretend that it never existed; []
    • 1839, Charles Darwin, chapter IX, in The Voyage of the Beagle[1]:
      Within a very few years after these islands shall have become regularly settled, in all probability this fox will be classed with the dodo, as an animal which has perished from the face of the earth.
  2. (figuratively) A person or organisation which is very old or has very old-fashioned views or is not willing to change and adapt.
  3. (golf) A hole in one.
    • 2012, Arv Olson, Backspin: 120 Years of Golf in British Columbia, page 253:
      "Most of the aces weren't on holes I would have liked to have made them on," confessed Colk, who dropped his fifth dodo of 1935 on December 29, which was believed at the time to be a record for most aces in a year.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Yoruba dòdò (fried plantain).

Noun edit

dodo (uncountable)

  1. (Nigeria) Fried plantain.
    • 2015, Kemi Quinn, African Dishes Made Easy:
      Dodo is everybody's favorite! It is a superb snack, a side dish, a breakfast food or a dessert all rolled into one. The best dodo is made from soft (almost over ripe) plantain which is cut in 1/2 inch thick diagonal slices and fried to a crispy golden brown.
    • 2015, Chigozie Obioma, The Fishermen: A Novel:
      Mother had banned it a year or so earlier after Obembe and I stole pieces from Mother's cooler, and lied that we'd seen rats eating the dodos.
    • 2018, Remmi Smith, The Healthy Teen Cookbook: Around the World In 80 Fantastic Recipes:
      One popular Nigerian dish is fried plantain, which is called “dodo.”

Anagrams edit

Cebuano edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English dodo, of uncertain etymology.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: do‧do

Noun edit

dodo

  1. dodo (Raphus cucullatus)

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdoːdoː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: do‧do

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Portuguese dodô.

Noun edit

dodo m (plural dodo's, diminutive dodootje n)

  1. dodo, †Raphus cucullatus
    Synonyms: dodaars, dronte, walgvogel

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from French dodo.

Noun edit

dodo m (uncountable)

  1. (Belgium, childish) Sleep, nighty night.
    Synonym: dokes
    Wil je dodo doen?Do you want to go to sleep?

Anagrams edit

Esperanto edit

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

dodo (accusative singular dodon, plural dodoj, accusative plural dodojn)

  1. dodo

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

From English dodo.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdodo/, [ˈdo̞do̞]
  • Rhymes: -odo
  • Syllabification(key): do‧do

Noun edit

dodo

  1. dodo (extinct bird of the family Columbidae)
  2. dodo, †Raphus cucullatus (type species of the family)
  3. solitaire (two extinct birds of the family Columbidae, more specifically Réunion soilitaire, †Raphus solitarius and Rodriques solitaire, †Pezophaps solitaria)

Usage notes edit

Declension edit

Inflection of dodo (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative dodo dodot
genitive dodon dodojen
partitive dodoa dodoja
illative dodoon dodoihin
singular plural
nominative dodo dodot
accusative nom. dodo dodot
gen. dodon
genitive dodon dodojen
partitive dodoa dodoja
inessive dodossa dodoissa
elative dodosta dodoista
illative dodoon dodoihin
adessive dodolla dodoilla
ablative dodolta dodoilta
allative dodolle dodoille
essive dodona dodoina
translative dodoksi dodoiksi
abessive dodotta dodoitta
instructive dodoin
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of dodo (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative dodoni dodoni
accusative nom. dodoni dodoni
gen. dodoni
genitive dodoni dodojeni
partitive dodoani dodojani
inessive dodossani dodoissani
elative dodostani dodoistani
illative dodooni dodoihini
adessive dodollani dodoillani
ablative dodoltani dodoiltani
allative dodolleni dodoilleni
essive dodonani dodoinani
translative dodokseni dodoikseni
abessive dodottani dodoittani
instructive
comitative dodoineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative dodosi dodosi
accusative nom. dodosi dodosi
gen. dodosi
genitive dodosi dodojesi
partitive dodoasi dodojasi
inessive dodossasi dodoissasi
elative dodostasi dodoistasi
illative dodoosi dodoihisi
adessive dodollasi dodoillasi
ablative dodoltasi dodoiltasi
allative dodollesi dodoillesi
essive dodonasi dodoinasi
translative dodoksesi dodoiksesi
abessive dodottasi dodoittasi
instructive
comitative dodoinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative dodomme dodomme
accusative nom. dodomme dodomme
gen. dodomme
genitive dodomme dodojemme
partitive dodoamme dodojamme
inessive dodossamme dodoissamme
elative dodostamme dodoistamme
illative dodoomme dodoihimme
adessive dodollamme dodoillamme
ablative dodoltamme dodoiltamme
allative dodollemme dodoillemme
essive dodonamme dodoinamme
translative dodoksemme dodoiksemme
abessive dodottamme dodoittamme
instructive
comitative dodoinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative dodonne dodonne
accusative nom. dodonne dodonne
gen. dodonne
genitive dodonne dodojenne
partitive dodoanne dodojanne
inessive dodossanne dodoissanne
elative dodostanne dodoistanne
illative dodoonne dodoihinne
adessive dodollanne dodoillanne
ablative dodoltanne dodoiltanne
allative dodollenne dodoillenne
essive dodonanne dodoinanne
translative dodoksenne dodoiksenne
abessive dodottanne dodoittanne
instructive
comitative dodoinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative dodonsa dodonsa
accusative nom. dodonsa dodonsa
gen. dodonsa
genitive dodonsa dodojensa
partitive dodoaan
dodoansa
dodojaan
dodojansa
inessive dodossaan
dodossansa
dodoissaan
dodoissansa
elative dodostaan
dodostansa
dodoistaan
dodoistansa
illative dodoonsa dodoihinsa
adessive dodollaan
dodollansa
dodoillaan
dodoillansa
ablative dodoltaan
dodoltansa
dodoiltaan
dodoiltansa
allative dodolleen
dodollensa
dodoilleen
dodoillensa
essive dodonaan
dodonansa
dodoinaan
dodoinansa
translative dodokseen
dodoksensa
dodoikseen
dodoiksensa
abessive dodottaan
dodottansa
dodoittaan
dodoittansa
instructive
comitative dodoineen
dodoinensa

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Childish reduplication of dormir.

Noun edit

dodo m (plural dodos)

  1. (childish) sleep, kip
    Tu veux faire dodo?Do you want to go to sleep?
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Portuguese doudo or Dutch dodaars.

Noun edit

dodo m (plural dodos)

  1. a dodo bird

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɔ.do/
  • Rhymes: -ɔdo
  • Hyphenation: dò‧do

Noun edit

dodo m (plural dodi)

  1. dodo

Anagrams edit

Mauritian Creole edit

Etymology 1 edit

From French dodo.

Noun edit

dodo

  1. dodo bird

Etymology 2 edit

From French dodo.

Verb edit

dodo

  1. to sleep (childish)

References edit

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Nigerian Pidgin edit

 
Dodo

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Yoruba dòdò (fried plantain).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dodo

  1. Fried plantain.
    • 2021 July 6, “RMD: Richard Mofe-Damijo profile inside six fun facts”, in BBC Pidgin[2]:
      RMD bin love beans and dodo (fried plantain) but e change di diet plan for health reasons.
      RMD loved beans and fried plantain but he changed his diet plan for health reasons.

Old Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Substantive form of dōt (dead).

Noun edit

dōdo m

  1. dead person

Inflection edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle Dutch: dôde

Further reading edit

  • dōdo”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Seychellois Creole edit

Etymology edit

From French dodo.

Verb edit

dodo

  1. to sleep

References edit

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol - Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois - Français

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdodo/ [ˈd̪o.ð̞o]
  • Rhymes: -odo
  • Syllabification: do‧do

Noun edit

dodo m (plural dodos)

  1. dodo
    Synonym: (obsolete) dronte

Further reading edit

Swahili edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dodo (ma class, plural madodo)

  1. breast (organ)

Synonyms edit

Tagalog edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: do‧do
  • IPA(key): /ˈdodoʔ/, [ˈdo.doʔ]

Noun edit

dodò (Baybayin spelling ᜇᜓᜇᜓ)

  1. Alternative form of dede

Ye'kwana edit

Etymology edit

Probably from Spanish loro (parrot).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dodo

  1. the yellow-crowned amazon, Amazona ochrocephala
  2. the blue-fronted amazon, Amazona aestiva
  3. the two-striped forest-pitviper or parrotsnake, Bothrops bilineatus

References edit

  • Alberto Rodriguez, Nalúa Rosa Silva Monterrey, Hernán Castellanos, et al., editors (2012), “dodo”, in Ye’kwana-Sanema Nüchü’tammeküdü Medewadinña Tüwötö’se’totojo [Guidelines for the management of the Ye’kwana and Sanema territories in the Caura River basin in Venezuela] (in Ye'kwana and Spanish), Forest Peoples Programme, →ISBN, page 120, 126
  • Ye’kwana nonoodö: yawaadeejudinnha wenhä = Território Ye’kwana: a vida em Auaris[3] (in Ye'kwana and Portuguese), São Paulo: ISA – Instituto Socioambiental, 2017, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 91
  • Hall, Katherine Lee (1988), “dodo”, in The morphosyntax of discourse in De'kwana Carib, volume I and II, Saint Louis, Missouri: PhD Thesis, Washington University
  • Hall, Katherine (2007), “dodo”, in Mary Ritchie Key & Bernard Comrie, editors, The Intercontinental Dictionary Series[4], Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, published 2021

Yoruba edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
Òòrùn alẹ́ t'ó rẹ̀ dòdò.

Noun sense derives from the ideophone sense.

Pronunciation edit

Ideophone edit

dòdò

  1. (of an object) being deeply or richly red
    rẹ̀ dòdòTo turn or become a deep red
    Ara wọn rẹ̀ dòdò bíi ẹ̀jẹ̀.
    Their body turned dark red like blood.
    • 1997, Sachnine Michika, “dòdò”, in Dictionnaire usuel yorùbá-français suivi d'un index français-yorùbá (overall work in French), Ibadan, Nigeria: Éditions Karthala and IFRA-Ibadan, →ISBN, page 220:
      Àwọn Yorùbá kì í wọ aṣọ tó bá rẹ̀ dòdò.
      The Yoruba do not wear bright red clothes.
    • 2008 December 19, Yiwola Awoyale, “dòdò”, in Global Yoruba Lexical Database v. 1.0[5], number LDC2008L03, Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium, →DOI, →ISBN:
      Ó rẹ̀ dòdò bí òòrùn alẹ́.
      It turned deep red like the late evening sun.
    • 2008 December 19, Yiwola Awoyale, “dòdò”, in Global Yoruba Lexical Database v. 1.0[6], number LDC2008L03, Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium, →DOI, →ISBN:
      Ó já sí pápá, ó rẹ̀ dòdò, ó so igba àdó mọ́rí.
      It bursts into the open field, it comes out in deep red, it ties two hundred tiny gourds on its head (riddle = imí/ìgbẹ́ (feces))
    • 2008 December 19, Yiwola Awoyale, quoting A. Babalola, “dòdò”, in Orin Ọdẹ fún Àṣeyẹ[7], number LDC2008L03, 1973, Ibadan: Macmillan Nigeria Publishers Ltd., page 26, quoted in Global Yoruba Lexical Database v. 1.0, Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium, →DOI, →ISBN:
      Ìlẹ̀pa dòdò kì í jẹ́ kí òkú bẹ̀nìyàn wò.
      The deep red laterite from fresh grave does not allow the dead to come and visit his relations.
    • 2009, “Gẹnẹsisi 49”, in Bíbélì Mímọ́ Yorùbá Òde Òn [Yoruba Contemporary Bible (YCB)], Biblica, Inc:
      12: Ojú rẹ̀ yóò rẹ̀ dòdò ju wáìnì lọ.
      12: His eyes will become redder than wine.
Derived terms edit

Noun edit

dòdò

 
Ẹ̀wà àti dòdò.
  1. Fried plantain
    dín dòdòto fry plantain
    Dòdò díndín ṣòro rárá.
    Frying plantain isn't hard at all.
    • 1993 November 24, Antonia Yétúndé Fọlárìn Schleicher, Jẹ́ K'Á Sọ Yorùbá [Let's Speak Yoruba], Yale University, →ISBN, page 197:
      Oúnjẹ tí mo fẹ́ràn ju ni dòdò. Oúnjẹ díndín ni dòdò. Dòdò kò ṣòro láti dín rárá.
      My favorite food is fried plantain. It's a fried food. (Fried) Plantain isn't hard to fry at all.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • English: dodo
  • Nigerian Pidgin: dodo

Etymology 2 edit

 
Dòdo

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dòdo

  1. Callichilia

Etymology 3 edit

 
Dòdo

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dòdo

  1. The poison devil's-pepper, Rauvolfia vomitoria

Etymology 4 edit

 
Dòdo

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dòdo

  1. Tabernaemontana pachysiphon

Etymology 5 edit

From di (to become) +‎ odò (river).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

dodò

  1. to become or be transformed into a river or stream
    • 2008 December 19, Yiwola Awoyale, quoting I. O. Delano, “dodò”, in Orin Ọdẹ fún Àṣeyẹ[8], number LDC2008L03, 1966, Ibadan: University Press Limited, page 24, quoted in Global Yoruba Lexical Database v. 1.0, Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium, →DOI, →ISBN:
      Ìrì kérékéré níí dodò; ìrì wàràwàrà níí dòjò, kí ọmọdé méje kọ oúnjẹ alẹ́ níí dìjà àgbàlagbà.
      Just as it is the trickles of dew that become a stream, and it is the falling of heavy dews that form rains, so for seven siblings to refuse their dinner would provoke a fight between adults (proverb on the danger of minor events).
Alternative forms edit
  • d'odò (standard orthography when odò has a qualifier)

Etymology 6 edit

 
Dodo

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

dodo

  1. The plants Adenia lobata and Adenia cissampeloides.

Etymology 7 edit

From (to arrive at) +‎ odò (river).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

dódò

  1. to arrive at a river or stream
    • 2008 December 19, Yiwola Awoyale, “dódò”, in Global Yoruba Lexical Database v. 1.0[9], number LDC2008L03, Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium, →DOI, →ISBN:
      Mo dódò mo kàndí/tìró, mi ò rọ́lọ́kọ̀ tí yóò tù mí gàlé, omi ńlá ti gbé ẹja lọ!
      I got to the river and stood back; I did not find a canoe man to pilot me across; the bigger river has swept off the fish!
Alternative forms edit
  • d'ódò (standard orthography when odò has a qualifier)
Derived terms edit
  • adódò (the one that arrives at the river)
  • adódòmáwẹ̀ (the one that arrives at the river but does not clean themselves)

References edit

  • Awoyale, Yiwola (December 19, 2008) Global Yoruba Lexical Database v. 1.0[10], volume LDC2008L03, Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium, →ISBN
  • Gbile, Z. O. (1984) Vernacular Names of Nigerian Plants (in Yoruba), Ibadan, Nigeria: Forestry Research Institute of Nigeria, page 533-534
  • Verger, Pierre Fatumbi (1997) Ewé: The Use of Plants in Yoruba Society, Sāo Paulo: Companhia das Latras, page 20