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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Scots tot, a shortened form of totum (small child; tot), of uncertain origin. Compare totter, tottle. Compare also Old Norse tottr (name of a dwarf), Swedish tutte (small child), Danish tommeltot (little child).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

NounEdit

tot (plural tots)

  1. A small child.
    He learned to run when he was just a tot.
  2. A measure of spirits, especially rum.
    • 1897: Mary H. Kingsley, Travels in West Africa
      Then I give them a tot of rum apiece, as they sit huddled in their blankets.
    • 1916: Siegfried Sassoon, The Working Party
      And tot of rum to send him warm to sleep.
  3. (Britain, dialect, dated) A foolish fellow.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Short for total (to sum).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tot (third-person singular simple present tots, present participle totting, simple past and past participle totted)

  1. To sum or total. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  2. (Britain, historical) To mark (a debt) with the word tot (Latin for "so much"), indicating that it was good or collectible for the amount specified.
    a totted debt
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

tot (plural tots)

  1. An addition of a long column of figures.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch tot, from Middle Dutch tot, tōte, from Old Dutch tote, toti (to, until).

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

tot

  1. until

PrepositionEdit

tot

  1. until

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

tot m (plural toteanj)

  1. old man
  2. grandfather

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan tot, from Latin tōtus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tot (feminine tota, masculine plural tots, feminine plural totes)

  1. all

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everything

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Chinook JargonEdit

NounEdit

tot

  1. uncle

Coordinate termsEdit

  • (with regards to gender): kwalh

Crimean TatarEdit

NounEdit

tot

  1. rust, corrosion

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus. Compare Romanian, Romansch, Occitan, and Catalan tot, Italian tutto, French tout, Spanish and Portuguese todo.

AdjectiveEdit

tot (feminine tota, masculine plural toč)

  1. all

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everything

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch tot, tōte, from Old Dutch tote, toti (to, until), equivalent to toe + te. Compare Old Saxon tōte (to, until), Old Frisian tot (until), Old High German zuo ze.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

tot

  1. until, till
    Ik kan niet wachten tot het hier ook weer gaat sneeuwen!I can't wait till it snows here as well!

PrepositionEdit

tot

  1. to, up to
  2. until

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German tōt (akin to Old Saxon dōd), from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Compare Dutch dood, English dead, Danish død, Norwegian daud

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tot (not comparable)

  1. dead, deceased

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • tot in Duden online

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tot (invariable)

  1. so many

NounEdit

tot m (invariable)

  1. so much

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *toti, adverb from *só. Cognate with Ancient Greek τόσος (tósos).

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

tot (indeclinable)

  1. so many

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan tot, from Latin tōtus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tot m (feminine singular tota, masculine plural tots, feminine plural totas)

  1. all

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everything

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus.

AdjectiveEdit

tot m (oblique and nominative feminine singular tote)

  1. all

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

tot

  1. all; completely

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

AdjectiveEdit

tōt

  1. dead

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus.

AdjectiveEdit

tot (nominative singular tuih)

  1. all

DescendantsEdit


RomagnolEdit

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everyone

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus. Compare Aromanian tut, Catalan tot, French tout, Italian tutto, Portuguese todo, Spanish todo.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

tot m, n (feminine singular toată, masculine plural toți, feminine and neuter plural toate)

  1. all, (the) whole
  2. (in the plural) all, every

DeclensionEdit

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everything

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) tut
  • (Puter, Vallader) tuot

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus.

AdverbEdit

tot

  1. (Surmiran) all

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French tot, from Latin tōtus.

AdjectiveEdit

tot

  1. all