EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Scots tot, a shortened form of totum (small child; tot), of uncertain origin. Compare totter, tottle. Compare also Old Norse tottr (name of a dwarf), Swedish tutte (small child), Danish tommeltot (little child).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tot (plural tots)

  1. A small child.
    He learned to run when he was just a tot.
  2. A measure of spirits, especially rum.
    • 1897: Mary H. Kingsley, Travels in West Africa
      Then I give them a tot of rum apiece, as they sit huddled in their blankets.
    • 1916: Siegfried Sassoon, The Working Party
      And tot of rum to send him warm to sleep.
  3. tater tot.
  4. (UK, dialect, obsolete) A foolish fellow.
    • a. 1660, A Contemporary History Of Affairs In Ireland:
      Whoe answeared like a toute, or a maddman, as he was, that he was for the Kinge.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Short for total (to sum).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tot (third-person singular simple present tots, present participle totting, simple past and past participle totted)

  1. To sum or total.
    • 2017: Paul Lockhart, Arithmetic
      There are, of course, many ways to proceed from here, the most likely being that you, as an experienced tradesman, would simply know what these amounts come to (in terms of groups of ten) and can tot them up in your head.
  2. (UK, historical) To mark (a debt) with the word tot (Latin for "so much"), indicating that it was good or collectible for the amount specified.
    a totted debt
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

tot (plural tots)

  1. A total, an addition of a long column of figures.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch tot, from Middle Dutch tot, tōte, from Old Dutch tote, toti (to, until).

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

tot

  1. until

PrepositionEdit

tot

  1. until

AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin totus.

AdjectiveEdit

tot

  1. all

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

tot m (plural toteanj)

  1. old man
  2. grandfather

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Classical Latin tōtus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tot (feminine tota, masculine plural tots, feminine plural totes)

  1. all
    Antonym: cap

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everything
    Antonym: res

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Chinook JargonEdit

NounEdit

tot

  1. uncle

Coordinate termsEdit

  • (with regard to gender): kwalh

Crimean TatarEdit

NounEdit

tot

  1. rust, corrosion

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus. Compare Romanian, Romansch, Occitan, and Catalan tot, Italian tutto, French tout, Spanish and Portuguese todo.

AdjectiveEdit

tot (feminine tota, masculine plural toč)

  1. all

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everything

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch tot, tōte, from Old Dutch tote, toti (to, until), equivalent to toe + te. Compare Old Saxon tōte (to, until), Old Frisian tot (until), Old High German zuo ze.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

tot

  1. to, up to
  2. until
  3. (telephony, Suriname) Used to answer a telephone call, followed by one's name, shortened from "u spreekt tot..."
    • 2020 August 25, Gerold Rozenblad, “Tafra drai [The table has turned]”, in De Ware Tijd[1], retrieved 14 July 2021:
      Gaat een telefoon over ergens in Paramaribo. "Ja, halloo tot Rabin."
      A phone rings somewhere in Paramaribo. "Yes, hello. This is Rabin."
    Synonym: (Netherlands) met

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: tot
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: tutu
  • Jersey Dutch: tut, tût
  • Negerhollands: tot, tee

ConjunctionEdit

tot

  1. until, till
    Ik kan niet wachten tot het hier ook weer gaat sneeuwen!I can't wait till it snows here as well!

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German tōt, from Old High German tōt (akin to Old Saxon dōd), from Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Compare Dutch dood, English dead, Danish død, Norwegian Nynorsk daud.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tot (strong nominative masculine singular toter, not comparable)

  1. dead, deceased

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • tot” in Duden online
  • tot” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tot (invariable)

  1. so many

NounEdit

tot m (invariable)

  1. so much

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *toti, adverb from *só. Cognate with Sanskrit तति (táti), Ancient Greek τόσος (tósos).

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

tot (indeclinable)

  1. so many
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 2.229:
      quid faciant paucī contrā tot mīlia fortēs?
      What can a few brave men do against so many thousands [of soldiers]?
      (Ovid here recounts the Battle of the Cremera.)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan tot, from Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Classical Latin tōtus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tot m (feminine singular tota, masculine plural tots, feminine plural totas)

  1. all
  2. each, every
    Synonym: cada

Derived termsEdit

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everything

Derived termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Latin tōtus.

AdjectiveEdit

tot m (oblique and nominative feminine singular tote)

  1. all

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

tot

  1. all; completely

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *daud, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

AdjectiveEdit

tōt

  1. dead

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: tōt
    • Alemannic German:
    • Bavarian: doud
      Cimbrian: tòat
    • Central Franconian: dut, dot
      Hunsrik: dot
      Luxembourgish: dout
    • East Central German:
      Erzgebirgisch: duud
      Upper Saxon: [Term?]
    • East Franconian: [Term?]
    • German: tot
    • Rhine Franconian: dut, dot
    • Yiddish: טויט(toyt)

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus.

AdjectiveEdit

tot (nominative singular tuih)

  1. all

RomagnolEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Latin tōtus.

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everyone

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus. Compare Aromanian tut, Catalan tot, French tout, Italian tutto, Portuguese todo, Spanish todo.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

tot m or n (feminine singular toată, masculine plural toți, feminine and neuter plural toate)

  1. all, (the) whole
    Tot timpu mă enervezi.You annoy me all the time.
  2. (in the plural) all, every

DeclensionEdit

PronounEdit

tot

  1. everything
    Tot ce faci contează.Everything you do matters.
  2. everyone
    Vă mulțumesc tuturor.I thank you all.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

tot n (uncountable)

  1. the whole, entirety
    Synonyms: întreg, unitate
    1. (figuratively) world, universe
      Synonyms: lume, univers
  2. crucial part, crux

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) tut
  • (Puter, Vallader) tuot

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Latin tōtus.

AdverbEdit

tot

  1. (Surmiran) all

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French tot, from Vulgar Latin tōttus, alteration of Latin tōtus.

AdjectiveEdit

tot

  1. all

WastekEdit

NounEdit

tot

  1. turkey vulture

ReferencesEdit