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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  • 19th c., borrowed from Russian униат (uniat, a united Greek, noun), from Polish uniat (one having the characteristics of union), from unia (union) +‎ -at (-ate), from Latin ūniō (union).

    PronunciationEdit

    • enPR: yo͞oʹnē-ăt', yo͞oʹnē-ĭt'; IPA(key): /ˈyu.niˌæt/, /ˈyu.niˌɪt/
    • Rhymes: -æt, -ɪt
    • Hyphenation: U‧ni‧at

    AdjectiveEdit

    Uniat (not comparable)

    1. Alternative spelling of Uniate [from 19th c.]
      • 1818, [From the two Burjat Nobles to their Prince], “Russia”, in Report - British and Foreign Bible Society, volume 15, London: Bible House, OCLC 756272064, page 192:
        The Greek Uniat Archbishop at Polotzki Johannes Krasszofsky has sent 1970 rubles in bank assignments
      • 1850, Neale, John M., A History of the Holy Eastern Church, volume 1, London [u.a.]: Masters, OCLC 795340215, page 56:
        temporal advantages were held out to the Uniat Greeks: no change was at first enforced

    NounEdit

    Uniat (plural Uniats)

    1. Alternative spelling of Uniate

    SynonymsEdit

    HypernymsEdit

    • Catholic (a member of a Catholic church)

    Coordinate termsEdit

    • Orthodox (a member of an Orthodox church)

    ReferencesEdit

    AnagramsEdit