abrier

Contents

FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Old French abrier ‎(to cover), from Late Latin abrigare ‎(to cover, shelter), from a- + brigare, from Frankish *berīhan ‎(to cover, protect), from Proto-Germanic *bi- + *wrīhaną ‎(to cover, clothe), from Proto-Indo-European *werk'-, *werg'- ‎(to twist, weave, tie together). Cognate with Old High German birīhan ‎(to cover), Old English bewrēon ‎(to cover, enwrap, protect).

Late Latin abrigare may have also been crossed with Frankish *bergan ‎(to take care of, protect, hide), from Proto-Germanic *berganą ‎(to care for), from Proto-Indo-European *bhergh- ‎(to take care), due to similarity in form and meaning[1]. If so, this would relate the word also to Old High German bergan ‎(to shelter) (German bergen), and Old English beorgan ‎(to save, preserve). More at borrow.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

abrier

  1. (dialectal) to cover with a bedcover; to tuck in
  2. (archaic or dialectal) Alternative form of abriter

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Diez, An etymological dictionary of the Romance languages; chiefly from the German, "Abrigo."

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

abrier

  1. to shelter
  2. (reflexive, s'abrier) to take shelter; to shelter oneself

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

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