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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown, possibly from a calque of Old English *æfgod (literally off- +‎ god), but first attested in early modern dictionaries of Old English and probably mistakenly attributed based on Dutch afgod or Old Saxon afgod, which appears in pseudo-Bede's translation of the Sermon for All Saints' Day. The Dutch, Old Saxon, etc. forms derive from Old High German abgot (idol, pagan god), from ab- (off, away from) + got (God, god). Compare Old English æfgælþ (superstition) and Gothic 𐌰𐍆𐌲𐌿𐌸𐍃 (afguþs, godless, impious). (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

afgod (plural afgods)

  1. (religion, derogatory, historical, obsolete) An idol.
  2. (religion, derogatory, historical, obsolete) A pagan god.
  3. (heraldry, historical, obsolete) A kind of dragon associated with such idols or gods.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch afgod, afgot, from Old Dutch afgot. Equivalent to af +‎ god. Compare German Abgott, obsolete English afgod.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑf.xɔt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: af‧god

NounEdit

afgod m (plural afgoden, diminutive afgodje n)

  1. (religion, derogatory) idol; false deity

Derived termsEdit