See also: AF, aF, A.F., af-, .af, äf, and âf

EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

af (not comparable)

  1. (postpositive, vulgar, slang, Internet slang, text messaging) Initialism of as fuck.
    • 2009 April 6, Kull, Ashley, “Bored af!!!!”, in Twitter[1], archived from the original on 2016-06-14:
      Bored af!!!!

AnagramsEdit


AfarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Cushitic *ʔaf-, from Proto-Afroasiatic [Term?]. Compare Oromo afaan, Somali af and Amharic አፍ (ʾäf).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

áf m (plural afitté or afoofá or afoofí f)

  1. mouth
  2. language

Usage notesEdit

The plural afitté is used in the southern dialects, whereas afoofá and afoofí are used in the northern dialects.

ReferencesEdit

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[2], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse af, from Proto-Germanic *ab. Related to English of, off and German ab

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [a], (in the end of a phrase) [ˈæːˀ]

PrepositionEdit

af

  1. by
    the active part, originator: En roman af Hemingway - A novel by Hemingway
  2. of
    indicating connection: Ejeren af huset - The owner of the house
    in descriptions: En mand af format - A man of stature; Et hus lavet af træ - A house made of wood
    part of: ni ud af ti - nine out of ten
  3. from
    of origin: Jeg hørte det af ham - I heard it from him
  4. off
    away from: Jeg faldt af cyklen - I fell off the bike
  5. with
    caused by: grøn af misundelse - green with envy
  6. out of
    motivated by: Han gjorde det af nysgerrighed - He did it out of curiosity

AdverbEdit

af

  1. off
    tage sit tøj af - take off one's clothes
  1. of
    på grund af - because of

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch af, from Old Dutch af, from Proto-Germanic *ab.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɑf/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: af
  • Rhymes: -ɑf

AdverbEdit

af

  1. off
  2. (postpositional) off, from (implying motion)
    Stomdronken reed de automobilist de weg af.
    Totally drunk, the motorist drove off the road.

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

af (used only predicatively, comparative meer af, superlative meest af)

  1. finished, done (when working on something)
    Het huis is af.
    The house is ready.
  2. (games) out, dismissed from play under the rules of the game, e.g. by having been tagged

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

af

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍆

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse af, from Proto-Germanic *ab.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

af

  1. (with dative) off, from
  2. (with dative) of
  3. (with dative) by

Derived termsEdit


MalteseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

af

  1. imperative singular of jaf

MapudungunEdit

PrepositionEdit

af (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. beside; next to.

ReferencesEdit

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch af, from Proto-Germanic *ab.

AdverbEdit

af

  1. off, out, away
  2. of, about

Usage notesEdit

Generally found in combination with a locative adverb such as hier, daer. Also found combined with a verb. In prepositional usage, van was used.

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: af
  • Limburgish: aaf

Further readingEdit


Middle WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

af

  1. first-person singular present indicative of mynet

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ab, whence also Old English æf, af, of (English of), Old Saxon ab, af, Old High German aba, abo (German ab), Gothic 𐌰𐍆 (af). Compare also au- in Icelandic auvirði.

PrepositionEdit

af

  1. of, from, off, by

DescendantsEdit

  • Danish: af
  • Faroese: av
  • Icelandic: af
  • Norwegian Bokmål: av
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: av
  • Swedish: av

ReferencesEdit

  • af in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ab.

PrepositionEdit

af

  1. of
  2. out

Old SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

af f (plural aues)

  1. Apocopic form of aue (bird)
    • c. 1250, Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 97v.
      […] Et q́ deſcéda ſobreſta piedra la uertud de oḿe q́ téga en la mano dieſtra lança ¬ en la ſinieſtra un af traſtornada.
      […] And may over this stone descend the virtue of the man with a spear in his right hand and an upturned bird on his left.

PortugueseEdit

InterjectionEdit

af

  1. (Internet slang) afe

Scottish GaelicEdit

InterjectionEdit

af

  1. arf

SomaliEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Beja [script needed] (yēf), Oromo afaan and Afar af.

NounEdit

af m

  1. mouth
  2. language

SwedishEdit

PrepositionEdit

af

  1. Archaic spelling of av.

Usage notesEdit

It's not used in everyday writing but it can still be seen in surnames of nobility, such as af Geijerstam and af Wisborg.

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • a (colloquial)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

af

  1. (literary) first-person singular present indicative/future of mynd

YolaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English of, from Old English of (of, from), an unstressed form of af, æf (from, off, away), from Proto-Germanic *ab (away; away from).

PrepositionEdit

af

  1. of

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN