Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

ailuro-(cat) +‎ -phile(lover), from Ancient Greek αἴλουρος(aílouros, cat) + φίλος(phílos, dear, beloved).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ailurophile (plural ailurophiles)

  1. A person with ailurophilia; a cat-lover.
    • 1971, E. F. Bleiler, “Introduction”, in Ghost Stories of an Antiquary, Montague Rhodes James, page 4:
      He played the piano well, was an enthusiastic ailurophile, and persistently played solitaire while talking and writing.
    • 2001, Woodeene Koenig-Bricker, Praying With the Saints: Making Their Prayers Your Own, page 192:
      When the archbishop would send Philip on an assignment, he would leave the cat in the care of the archbishop, who apparently was not an ailurophile.
    • 2002, Carol Shields, Unless, page 195:
      Alicia is not a serious ailurophile, however; she neglects Chestnut, and Chestnut knows it.
    • 2005, Dan Rice, Bengal Cats: Everything about Purchase, Care, Nutrition, Breeding, Health Care and Behavior, page 53:
      Your identity as an ailurophile (cat lover) is confirmed by cat hair on your clothes, but that is a distinction that most of us will gladly forfeit.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ailurophil(e)” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Coined based on Ancient Greek; see above.

NounEdit

ailurophile m, f (plural ailurophiles)

  1. ailurophile

AdjectiveEdit

ailurophile m, f (plural ailurophiles)

  1. ailurophile

External linksEdit