See also: løver and Lover

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lovere, luffer, lufere, equivalent to love +‎ -er.

Alternative formsEdit

  • lovyer (dialectal or obsolete)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lover (plural lovers)

  1. One who loves and cares for another person in a romantic way; a sweetheart, love, soulmate, boyfriend, girlfriend or spouse.
    Synonyms: love, love interest, spouse, sweetheart, significant other; see also Thesaurus:lover
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act II, scene vi], page 170, column 2:
      [] loue is blinde, and louers cannot ſee / The pretty follies that themſelues commit, []
    • 1976, Joni Mitchell (lyrics and music), “Song For Sharon”, in Hejira:
      Well there's a wide wide world of noble causes / And lovely landscapes to discover / But all I really want to do right now / Is find another lover
    • 2016, David Boulter; Stuart A. Staples (lyrics and music), “Like Only Lovers Can”, in The Waiting Room, performed by Tindersticks:
      We can only hurt each other the way that lovers can / So where do we go, where do we hide now?
  2. A sexual partner, especially one with whom someone is having an affair.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:sexual partner
    • 2018 January 17, "Libra Woman: Personality Traits: Love & More", Astrology.com [1]
      A Libra woman seems to always be in love - either with her long term partner or with an ever-changing series of rotating lovers.
  3. A person who loves something.
    Synonym: connoisseur
    a lover of fine wines
    a lover of his/her own country
  4. (West Country, with "my") An informal term of address for any friend.
    All right, me lover?
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • German: Lover
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

lover (plural lovers)

  1. Obsolete form of louver.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch lover, originally the plural of loof. As with other words with plurals in -er, eventually this was substituted with -eren, creating loveren. This new plural was then reanalysed as a separate noun and a new singular form lover was back-formed from it.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lover n (plural lovers, diminutive lovertje n)

  1. foliage

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

A 17th century borrowing from North Sea Germanic language verb "lofen, lufen". The 1986 Dictionnaire de l'Académie française identifies the source as Low German (Dutch Low Saxon or German Low German); Jan de Vries' Nederlands Etymologisch Woordenboek (which identifies it as a possible cognate of Dutch leuver) suggests East Frisian instead.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lover

  1. to coil (a rope or cord), to fake a line
  2. (reflexive, of a snake) to coil up, wind up; to curl up

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

lover (plural lovers)

  1. lover

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

lover m pl

  1. indefinite masculine plural of lov

VerbEdit

lover

  1. present tense of love

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lover f pl

  1. indefinite feminine plural of lov

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

lover

  1. present of lova