English

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /əˈmjuːzɪŋ/
  • Audio (US):(file)

Verb

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amusing

  1. present participle and gerund of amuse

Adjective

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amusing (comparative more amusing, superlative most amusing)

  1. Entertaining.
    The film has some amusing moments, but it is unlikely to make you laugh out loud.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 5, in The China Governess: A Mystery, London: Chatto & Windus, →OCLC:
      ‘It's rather like a beautiful Inverness cloak one has inherited. Much too good to hide away, so one wears it instead of an overcoat and pretends it's an amusing new fashion.’
    • 2012 December 21, George Monbiot, “Your gift at Christmas will soon be junk”, in The Guardian Weekly[1], volume 188, number 2, page 24:
      They seem amusing on the first day of Christmas, daft on the second, embarrassing on the third. By the twelfth they're in landfill. For 30 seconds of dubious entertainment, or a hedonic stimulus that lasts no longer than a nicotine hit, we commission the use of materials whose impacts will ramify for generations.
  2. Funny, hilarious.

Synonyms

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Antonyms

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Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams

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