EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin andron, from Ancient Greek ἀνδρῶν (andrôn).

NounEdit

andron (plural androns)

  1. (architecture, historical) In Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, the apartment reserved for males, in the lower part of the house.

TranslationsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “andron” in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀνδρών (andrṓn).

NounEdit

andrōn m (genitive andrōnis); third declension

  1. hallway, passageway, corridor

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative andrōn andrōnēs
Genitive andrōnis andrōnum
Dative andrōnī andrōnibus
Accusative andrōnem andrōnēs
Ablative andrōne andrōnibus
Vocative andrōn andrōnēs

ReferencesEdit

  • andron”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • andron in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • andron”, in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • andron”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • andron”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • andron”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

andron m (plural androns)

  1. (historical) andron (room or house reserved for males)