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See also: Male, Malé, mâle, malë, måle, małe, and málé

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English male, borrowed from Old French masle, malle (Modern French mâle), from Latin masculus (masculine, a male), diminutive of mās (male, masculine).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

male (not comparable)

  1. Belonging to the sex which has testes and/or XY chromosomes. [from 14th c.]
    • 2003, Manju Yadav, Biotechnology ISBN 8171417124, page 314:
      Affected individuals are therefore chromosomally male but for the most part phenotypically female, and they are, or course, unable to bear children. Nevertheless, many do marry as women []
    • For usage examples of this term, see Citations:male.
  2. Belonging to the masculine gender (social category).
  3. (biology) Typical of, or typically found in, the male of a species. [from 16-17th c.]
    • 2009 September 11, The Guardian:
      "It's very complex area," said Bowen-Simpkins, a consultant gynaecologist. "The male hormone is what gives bulk to muscles and bones so they are at an advantage."
  4. (grammar, less common than 'masculine') Masculine; of the masculine grammatical gender.
    • 2012, Naomi McIlwraith, Kiyâm: Poems ISBN 1926836693, page 43:
      The teacher's voice inflects the pulse of nêhiyawêwin as he teaches us. He says a prayer in the first class. Nouns, we learn, have a gender. In French, nouns are male or female, but in Cree, nouns are living or non-living, animate or inanimate.
  5. (figuratively) Of instruments, tools, or connectors: designed to fit into or penetrate a female counterpart, as in a connector, pipe fitting or laboratory glassware. [from 16th c.]

SynonymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

male (plural males)

  1. One of the male (masculine) sex or gender.
    1. (sometimes offensive) A human member of the masculine sex or gender.
    2. An animal of the sex that has testes.
    3. A plant of the masculine sex.

AntonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German mālen (to draw, paint). Cognate with Icelandic mála (to paint).

VerbEdit

male (imperative mal, present maler, past malede or malte, past participle malet or malt)

  1. to paint
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mala, from Proto-Germanic *malaną (to grind), from Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (to grind, rub, break up). Cognate with Icelandic mala.

VerbEdit

male (imperative mal, infinitive at male, present tense maler, past tense malede, perfect tense er/har malet)

  1. to grind, mill
Derived termsEdit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

male

  1. (archaic) Dative singular form of maal

VerbEdit

male

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of malen

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From prefix mal- (antonym)+-e (indicates adverbs)

AdverbEdit

male

  1. on the contrary
  2. opposingly; in opposition
    male ol...
    as opposed to...

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Coined ex nihilo by Ado Grenzstein in the 19th century.

NounEdit

male (genitive male, partitive malet)

  1. (board games) chess

DeclensionEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

male

  1. First-person singular present of malen.
  2. Imperative singular of malen.
  3. First-person singular subjunctive I of malen.
  4. Third-person singular subjunctive I of malen.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin male.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmaː.le], /ˈmale/

AdverbEdit

male (comparative: peggio; superlative: malissimo)

  1. badly, wrongly

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

male m (plural mali)

  1. evil, harm
  2. pain, ache, illness, sickness, disease

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

male

  1. (archaic) feminine plural of malo (bad)

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From malus (bad, wicked).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

male (comparative pēius, superlative pessimē)

  1. badly
  2. wrongly
  3. cruelly, wickedly
  4. not much; feebly

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • male in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • male in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “male”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to deserve ill of a person; to treat badly: male mereri de aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to have a good or bad reputation, be spoken well, ill of: bene, male audire (ab aliquo)
    • (ambiguous) to inculcate good (bad) principles: bene (male) praecipere alicui
    • (ambiguous) a guilty conscience: animus male sibi conscius
    • (ambiguous) a moral (immoral) man: homo bene (male) moratus
    • (ambiguous) to bless (curse) a person: precari alicui bene (male) or omnia bona (mala), salutem
    • (ambiguous) to manage one's affairs, household, property well or ill: rem bene (male) gerere (vid. sect. XVI. 10a)
    • (ambiguous) to buy dearly: magno or male emere
    • (ambiguous) to win, lose a fight (of the commander): rem (bene, male) gerere (vid. sect. XII. 2, note rem gerere...)
    • (ambiguous) I am sorry to hear..: male (opp. bene) narras (de)

LimburgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch mālen, from Old Dutch *malan, from Proto-Germanic *malaną.

VerbEdit

male

  1. to mill

ConjugationEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse mála and Middle Low German malen

VerbEdit

male (imperative mal, present tense maler, passive males, simple past malte, past participle malt, present participle malende)

  1. to paint

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mala

VerbEdit

male (imperative mal, present tense maler, passive males, simple past mol or malte, past participle malt, present participle malende)

  1. to grind or mill (to make smaller by breaking with a device)
  2. to purr (of a cat, to make a vibrating sound in its throat when contented)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

male (present tense mel, past tense mol, past participle male, present participle malande, imperative mal)

  1. Alternative form of mala

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

male (present tense malar, past tense mala, past participle mala, passive infinitive malast, present participle malande, imperative male/mal)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by måle, to paint

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin mala, from Frankish *malha (leather bag).

NounEdit

male f (oblique plural males, nominative singular male, nominative plural males)

  1. pack, bag

DescendantsEdit