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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin anōdynos (stilling or relieving pain), from Ancient Greek ἀνώδυνος (anṓdunos, free from pain), from ἀν- (an-, without) + ὀδύνη (odúnē, pain).

Adjective sense “noncontentious” probably through French anodin (harmless, trivial), of same origin.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

anodyne (comparative more anodyne, superlative most anodyne)

  1. (pharmacology) Capable of soothing or eliminating pain. [from 16th c.]
    • 1847, Littell's Living Age, number 161, 12 June 1847, in Volume 13, page 483:
      Many a time has the vapor of ether been inhaled for the relief of oppressed lungs; many a time has the sought relief been thus obtained; and just so many times has the discovery of the wonderful anodyne properties of this gas, as affecting all bodily suffering, been brushed past and overlooked.
    • 1910, Edward L. Keyes, Diseases of the Genito-Urinary Organs, page 211:
      The citrate is the most efficient as an alkali, but irritates some stomachs, the liquor the most anodyne, the acetate the most diuretic.
  2. (figuratively) Soothing or relaxing. [from 18th c.]
    Classical music is rather anodyne.
  3. (by extension) Noncontentious, blandly agreeable, unlikely to cause offence or debate. [from 20th c.]
    Synonyms: bland, inoffensive, noncontentious
    • 2003, The Guardian, 20 May 2003:
      It all became so routine, so anodyne, so dull.
    • 2004, John Dickie, Cosa Nostra: A History Of The Sicilian Mafia, Hodder & Stoughton, →ISBN:
      What is less known about Cavalleria is that its story is the purest, most anodyne form of a myth about Sicily and the mafia, a myth that was something akin to the official ideology of the Sicilian mafia for nearly a century and a half.
    • 2010, "Rattled", The Economist, 9 Dec 2010:
      States typically like to stick to anodyne messages, like saving wildflowers or animals. But every so often a controversy crops up.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

anodyne (plural anodynes)

  1. (pharmacology) Any medicine or other agent that relieves pain.
  2. (figuratively) A source of relaxation or comfort.
    • 1890, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. VII:
      The air was heavy with the perfume of the flowers, and their beauty seemed to bring him an anodyne for his pain.
    • 1929, Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own, page 79:
      So, with a sigh, because novels so often provide an anodyne and not an antidote, glide one into torpid slumbers instead of rousing one with a burning brand.

TranslationsEdit

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FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

anodyne

  1. feminine of anodyn

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

anōdyne

  1. vocative masculine singular of anōdynos or anōdynus