comfort

See also: Comfort

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

comfort (countable and uncountable, plural comforts)

  1. Contentment, ease.
    Sleep in comfort with our new mattress.
  2. Something that offers comfort.
    the comforts of home
  3. A consolation; something relieving suffering or worry.
    We still have the spare tire? That's a comfort at least.
  4. A cause of relief or satisfaction.
    The outcome of the peace negotiations in Moscow in 1940 was a heavy blow to the young nation, but in the same time a great comfort: at least the independency was preserved.

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TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

comfort (third-person singular simple present comforts, present participle comforting, simple past and past participle comforted)

  1. (transitive) To relieve the distress or suffering of; to provide comfort to.
    Rob comforted Aaron because he was lost and very sad.
  2. (transitive) To make comfortable. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (obsolete) To make strong; to invigorate; to fortify; to corroborate.
  4. (obsolete) To assist or help; to aid.

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DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch confoort, from Old French confort.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

comfort n (plural comforts, diminutive comfortje n)

  1. Physical comfort, ease.

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French cunfort, confort.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kumˈfɔrt/, /kun-/

NounEdit

comfort (plural comforts)

  1. encouragement, assurance

DescendantsEdit

  • English: comfort
  • Yola: comfoort

ReferencesEdit