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See also: Bland and blând

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /blænd/
  • Rhymes: -ænd
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin blandus (pleasant, flattering).

AdjectiveEdit

bland (comparative blander, superlative blandest)

  1. Having a soothing effect; not irritating or stimulating.
    a bland oil;  a bland diet
  2. Lacking in taste, flavor, or vigor.
    The coffee was bland.  The judge found the defense's case to be bland.
  3. Lacking interest; boring; dull.
  4. (now rare) Mild; soft, gentle, balmy; smooth in manner; suave.
    • 1818, John Keats, Sonnet:
      Where didst thou find, young Bard, thy sounding lyre? / Where the bland accent, and the tender tone?
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter IX, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      “A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; []. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable, and from time to time squinting sideways, as usual, in the ever-renewed expectation that he might catch a glimpse of his stiff, retroussé moustache.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English blanden, blonden, from Old English blandan (to blend, mix, mingle; trouble, disturb, corrupt), from Proto-Germanic *blandaną (to mix, blend), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlendʰ- (to grow turbid, dim, see badly, be blind). Cognate with Danish and Norwegian blande, Swedish blanda (to mix, mingle, shuffle, blend), Icelandic blanda (to mix). See also blend.

VerbEdit

bland (third-person singular simple present blands, present participle blanding, simple past and past participle blanded)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To mix; blend; mingle.
  2. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To connect; associate.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English bland, from Old English bland, blond (blending, mixture, confusion), from Proto-Germanic *blandą (a mixing, mixture), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰlendʰ- (to grow turbid, dim, see badly, be blind). Cognate with Icelandic blanda (a mixture of liquids, especially of hot whey and water).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

bland (plural blands)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Mixture; union.
  2. A summer beverage prepared from the whey of churned milk, common among the inhabitants of the Shetland Islands.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

bland

  1. imperative of blande

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin blandus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bland (not comparable)

  1. (medicine) bland

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bland n (genitive singular blands, no plural)

  1. mix

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

bland

  1. imperative of blande

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

bland

  1. imperative of blande

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

bland

  1. among