Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French apoplectique, from Late Latin apoplēcticus, from Ancient Greek ἀποπληκτικός (apoplēktikós), from ἀπόπληκτος (apóplēktos), from ἀποπλήσσω (apoplḗssō), from ἀπό (apó, of, from) + πλήσσω (plḗssō, I strike).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌæpəˈplɛktɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛktɪk

AdjectiveEdit

apoplectic (comparative more apoplectic, superlative most apoplectic)

  1. (medicine) Of, or relating to apoplexy.
  2. Marked by extreme anger or fury.
    • 2011 March 13, Chris Bevan, “Stoke 2 - 1 West Ham”, in BBC[1]:
      The decision left Potters boss Tony Pulis apoplectic on the touchline, a feeling his West Ham counterpart Avram Grant was to share immediately after the break.
  3. (archaic) Effused with blood.

QuotationsEdit

  • 1960Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird, ch 11
    "Once she heard Jem refer to our father as 'Atticus' and her reaction was apoplectic."
  • 2005 — (author?), The New Yorker, (page?) (12 Dec)
    "Speak of the devil—he marches through the door, and becomes apoplectic when he learns of the upheaval."

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

apoplectic (plural apoplectics)

  1. A person suffering from apoplexy.