See also: Anger and ånger

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From Middle English anger (grief, pain, trouble, affliction, vexation, sorrow, wrath), from Old Norse angr, ǫngr (affliction, sorrow) (compare Old Norse ang, ǫng (troubled)), from Proto-Germanic *angazaz (grief, sorrow), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂enǵʰ- (narrow, tied together).

Cognate with Danish anger (regret, remorse), Norwegian Bokmål anger (regret, remorse), Swedish ånger (regret), Icelandic angur (trouble), Old English ange, enge (narrow, close, straitened, constrained, confined, vexed, troubled, sorrowful, anxious, oppressive, severe, painful, cruel), German Angst (anxiety, anguish, fear), Latin angō (squeeze, choke, vex), Albanian ang (fear, anxiety, pain, nightmare), Avestan𐬄𐬰𐬀𐬵(ązah, strangulation; distress), Ancient Greek ἄγχω (ánkhō, I squeeze, strangle), Sanskrit अंहु (aṃhu, anxiety, distress). Also compare with English anguish, anxious, quinsy, and perhaps to awe and ugly. The word seems to have originally meant “to choke, squeeze”.[1]

The verb is from Middle English angren, angeren, from Old Norse angra. Compare with Icelandic angra, Norwegian Nynorsk angra, Norwegian Bokmål angre, Swedish ångra, Danish angre.

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈæŋɡə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈæŋɡɚ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æŋɡə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: an‧ger

Noun edit

anger (countable and uncountable, plural angers)

  1. A strong feeling of displeasure, hostility, or antagonism towards someone or something, usually combined with an urge to harm, often stemming from perceived provocation, hurt, or threat.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:anger
    vent one's anger
    relieve one's anger
    manage one's anger
    soothe one's anger
    show one's anger
    do something in anger
    You need to control your anger.
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21:
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. When a series of bank failures made this impossible, there was widespread anger, leading to the public humiliation of symbolic figures.
  2. (obsolete) Pain or stinging.
    • 1660, Simon Patrick, Mensa mystica, published 1717, page 322:
      It heals the Wounds that Sin hath made; and takes away the Anger of the Sore; []
    • 1677 June 28, William Temple, “An Essay upon the Cure of Gout by Moxa. []”, in Miscellanea. The First Part. [...], 3rd edition, London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], and Awnsham and John Churchill, [], published 1691, →OCLC, page 209:
      I immediately made the Experiment, ſetting the Moxa where the firſt Violence of my Pain began, which was the Joint of the great Toe, and where the greateſt Anger and Soreneſs ſtill continued, [...]

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

anger (third-person singular simple present angers, present participle angering, simple past and past participle angered)

  1. (transitive) To cause such a feeling of antagonism in.
    Synonyms: enrage, infuriate, annoy, vex, grill, displease, aggravate, irritate
    He who angers you conquers you.
    • 1911, Heinrich Heine, translated by John Payne, The Poetical Works of Heinrich Heine: Now First Completely Rendered into English Verse, in Accordance with the Original Forms, volume one, Villon Society, page 176:
      “Poetling, fret thyself not! / I will not one tittle imperil / Thy sorry cockboat; / Nor yet thy poor dear life will I harass / With over-hazardous tossings. / For thou, little poet, ne’er angeredst me; / Thou hast me no least little pinnacle harmed / Of Priamus’ sacrosanct stronghold; / Nor even the least little lash hast thou singed / Of the eye of my son Polyphemus; / And thee with her counsels protected hath ne’er / The Goddess of Wisdom, Pallas Athené.”
  2. (intransitive) To become angry.
    Synonym: get angry (see angry for more)
    You anger too easily.

Translations edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Cornish edit

Noun edit

anger m

  1. anger (strong feeling of displeasure)

Finnish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Related to standard ankerias.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

anger (dialectal)

  1. eel

Etymology 2 edit

Related to standard angervo.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

anger (dialectal)

  1. plant of the genus Filipendula

References edit

  • anger”, in Suomen murteiden sanakirja [Dictionary of Finnish Dialects] (online dictionary, incomplete, continuously updated, in Finnish), Helsinki: Kotimaisten kielten keskus (Institute for the Languages of Finland), 2022.

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Old Norse angr, from Proto-Germanic *angazaz.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

anger (plural angers)

  1. Grief, painfulness, or discomfort; a feeling of pain or sadness.
  2. A trouble, affliction, or vexation; something that inflicts pain or hardship.
  3. Angriness, ire; the state of being angry, enraged, or wrathful.
  4. Indignation, spitefulness; the feeling of being wronged or treated unfairly.
  5. (rare) Irritableness; the state of being in a foul mood.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • English: anger
  • Scots: anger
  • >? Yola: garr
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

anger

  1. Alternative form of angren

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse angr.

Noun edit

anger m (definite singular angeren) (uncountable)

  1. regret, remorse, contrition, repentance, penitence

Related terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse angr.

Noun edit

anger m (definite singular angeren) (uncountable)

  1. regret, remorse, contrition, repentance, penitence

Related terms edit

References edit

Swedish edit

Verb edit

anger

  1. present indicative of ange

Anagrams edit