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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἄρχων (árkhōn), a noun use of the present participle of ἄρχω (árkhō, to rule).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑː(ɹ)kən/
  • (file)

NounEdit

archon (plural archontes or archons)

  1. A chief magistrate of ancient Athens.
    • 1980: Hated by the archons of Athens for his fearless condemnation of municipal graft, he was hypocritically arraigned on a charge of corrupting Athenian youth. (Burgess, Earthly Powers)
  2. A ruler, head of state or other leader.
    • 1922: But neither the midwife’s lore nor the caudlectures saved him from the archons of Sinn Fein and their noggin of hemlock. (Joyce, Ulysses)
  3. (Gnosticism) A supernatural being subordinate to the Demiurge.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

 archon on Latin Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἄρχων (árkhōn).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

archōn m (genitive archontis); third declension

  1. archon

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative archōn archontēs
Genitive archontis archontum
Dative archontī archontibus
Accusative archontem archontēs
Ablative archonte archontibus
Vocative archōn archontēs

ReferencesEdit

  • archon in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • archon in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • archon in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • archon in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • archon in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • archon in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • archon in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • archon in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin