EnglishEdit

 
Atole

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish atole, from Classical Nahuatl ātōlli.

NounEdit

atole (uncountable)

  1. A sweetened thick drink or thin gruel made from cornmeal, served hot
    • 1851, Mayne Reid, The Scalp Hunters[1]:
      "Pan fino, pan bianco!" screams the baker; and other cries from the vendors of atole, huevos, and leche, are uttered in shrill, discordant voices.
    • 2006 January 13, David Hammond, “Beyond the Burrito, Part 2: Michoacan”, in Chicago Reader[2]:
      Since the days of the Tarascans, the corn-loving folks of Michoacan have enjoyed atole, a maize-based gruel flavored with chocolate, fruit, tamarind, or herbs.
    • 2007 April 13, S. Kirk Walsh, “Festivals With a Mexican Flair”, in New York Times[3]:
      Visitors can learn to make their own tortillas or sample the traditional cornmeal drink atole.

See alsoEdit


PolishEdit

NounEdit

atole

  1. nominative plural of atol
  2. accusative plural of atol
  3. vocative plural of atol

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

atole

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of atolar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of atolar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of atolar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of atolar

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • atol (Cuba, El Salavador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Venezuela)
 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From Classical Nahuatl ātōlli.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aˈtole/, [aˈt̪ole]

NounEdit

atole m (plural atoles)

  1. (Mexico) atole, a thick, sweet, corn-based drink or gruel served hot
    dar atole con el dedo
    to deceive someone with false promises (literally, to feed someone atole with your finger)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: atole

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit