banjax

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • banjack
  • bandjax

EtymologyEdit

Unknown, perhaps originally Dublin slang.[1]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

banjax (third-person singular simple present banjaxes, present participle banjaxing, simple past and past participle banjaxed)

  1. (UK, originally Ireland, slang) To ruin or destroy.
    • For more quotes, see the citations page
    • 1928, Eimar O'Duffy, The Spacious Adventures of the Man in the Street, Macmillan, p. 370,
      Indeed, it seemed that the army was hopelessly banjaxed.
    • 1970 (2001 reprint), Edna O'Brien, A Pagan Place, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, p. 91,
      Emma had suggested that you hide, said your presence might banjax her position.
    • 2006, Craig Ferguson, Between the Bridge and the River, Chronicle Books, p. 252,
      Fraser was looking at the flat, wet countryside and thinking about the French policeman who had banjaxed him with the truncheon.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

banjax (plural banjaxes)

  1. (chiefly Ireland, informal) A mess or undesirable situation made as a result of incompetence.
    • 1922, Seán O'Casey, Juno and the Paycock (play),
      I'm tellin' you the scholar, Bentham, made a banjax o' th' Will.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 2013.
Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 00:50