bollocks

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbɒ.ləks/
  • (file)
  • Noun, verb
    (file)
  • Interjection
    (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ballokes (plural of ballok), from Old English beallucas (nominative plural of bealluc). Synchronically analyzable as bollock +‎ -s.

NounEdit

bollocks pl (normally plural, singular bollock)

  1. (Britain, Ireland, vulgar) The testicles (sometimes used in the singular)
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:testicles
  2. (Britain, Ireland, vulgar) Nonsense or information deliberately intended to mislead.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:nonsense
    That's a load of bollocks, mate!
    • 2014, Peter Smith, Confessions of a Dice Dealer, page 105:
      All the dealers would steam into his cabin for a few sherbets after work, and to listen to his bollocks.
  3. (Ireland, vulgar, used as singular) An idiot, an ignorant or disagreeable person.
    Don't mind him; he's only an oul' bollocks!
  4. (Britain, vulgar) Contraction of the dog's bollocks.
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit
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VerbEdit

bollocks (third-person singular simple present bollockses, present participle bollocksing, simple past and past participle bollocksed)

  1. (transitive, Britain, taboo, slang) To break.
    The telly's bollocksed.
  2. (transitive, Britain, taboo, slang) (also bollocks up) To fail (a task); to make a mess of.
    I bollocksed that exam.
TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bollocks

  1. (Britain, Ireland, taboo, slang) An expression of anger, frustration, etc.
    Oh bollocks, I'm late for work!
  2. (Britain, Ireland, taboo, slang) An expression of incredulity.
    Bollocks! That never happened!
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit


Etymology 2Edit

See bollock

VerbEdit

bollocks

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of bollock