EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bibben (whence bib; see there fore more) +‎ -le.

VerbEdit

bibble (third-person singular simple present bibbles, present participle bibbling, simple past and past participle bibbled)

  1. To eat and/or drink noisily.
  2. (intransitive) To tipple.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Yiddish

VerbEdit

bibble (third-person singular simple present bibbles, present participle bibbling, simple past and past participle bibbled)

  1. (colloquial) To worry.
    • 1919, Herbert Quick, The Fairview Idea: A Story of the New Rural Life, page 39:
      "Foxes have holes,' Uncle Abner," said Daisy, " 'and the birds of the air have nests, but the son of man hath not where to lay his head.' Why should we worry when we have such a bully place as this tent?" "Ish ka bibble," said the Reverend Frank. "Well," said I, "about the time the mosquitoes begin to come out of the marsh, you'll begin to bibble."

Etymology 3Edit

Corruption of the aboriginal name "Bimbil" for certain species of Eucalyptus

NounEdit

bibble (plural bibble)

  1. A species of Australian tree, the forest red gum, glossy-leaved box, or shiny-leaved box, Eucalyptus tereticornis.
    • 1909, J. H. Maiden, A Critical Revision of the Genus Eucalyptus:
      "Bibble Box," " Broad-leaf Box," or " Peppermint Box." Useful for fencing purposes, &c. Strong and durable. Habitat, open forests and low flats. Plentiful in some localities. Flowering period varies.